The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and El Paso Community College (EPCC) propose to renew their partnership to promote the successful transition of minority (primarily Mexican-American) students with interests in biomedical/behavioral sciences from the community college to the university and to improve their completion of a baccalaureate degree. This will expand the current highly successful Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program between these two institutions.
The specific aims of this proposal are the following:
SPECIFIC AIM #1 : To increase interest among minority students (primarily Mexican-Americans) in biomedical/behavioral sciences as a career and increase by 50% the applicant pool to the Bridges program. We propose to increase the pool of applicants from the current four-year (2005-2008) average of 82 per year to an average of 123 applicants per year over the proposed grant period (5 years).
SPECIFIC AIM #2 : To increase by 50% the transfer rate of Bridges participants to baccalaureate degrees in biomedical/behavioral sciences. We propose to increase transfer rate of Bridges participants to biomedical/behavioral science majors from the current four-year (2005-2008) 63% average to a 95% average over the proposed grant period (5 years).
SPECIFIC AIM #3 : To transfer professional skills and fully describe career options in the biomedical/behavioral sciences to Bridges participants. In our experience, the students from EPCC are typically unaware of career opportunities in biomedical/behavioral science- related fields beyond that of nursing, physiotherapy, and medicine. These students have little or no exposure to other biomedical/behavioral professionals and researchers, and do not know what skills are expected from them. The previous successful weekly colloquia with seminar and workshop series to instruct students on key professional skills and potential opportunities will be maintained.
SPECIFIC AIM #4 : To significantly increase the percentage of transferred participants who complete a baccalaureate degree in biomedical/behavioral sciences. We propose to increase the percentage of Bridges participants who attain the baccalaureate degree in biomedical/behavioral sciences from our historical (17-year) average of 60% to an average of 80% over the proposed grant period (5 years). The ultimate goal of our proposal is to increase the influx of underrepresented minorities (mainly Hispanics) into biomedical/behavioral science careers and encourage them toward a graduate (Ph.D.) research program. Public Health Relevance: The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and El Paso Community College (EPCC) propose to renew their partnership to promote the successful transition of minority (primarily Mexican-American) students with interests in biomedical/behavioral sciences from the community college to the university and to improve their completion of a baccalaureate degree. This will expand the current highly successful Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program between these two institutions.
The specific aims of this proposal are the following:
SPECIFIC AIM #1 : To increase interest among minority students (primarily Mexican-Americans) in biomedical/behavioral sciences as a career and increase by 50% the applicant pool to the Bridges program.
SPECIFIC AIM #2 : To increase by 50% the transfer rate of Bridges participants to baccalaureate degrees in biomedical/behavioral sciences.
SPECIFIC AIM #3 : To transfer professional skills and fully describe career options in the biomedical/behavioral sciences to Bridges participants.
SPECIFIC AIM #4 : To significantly increase the percentage of transferred participants who complete a baccalaureate degree in biomedical/behavioral sciences. The ultimate goal of our proposal is to increase the influx of underrepresented minorities (mainly Hispanics) into biomedical/behavioral science careers and encourage them toward a graduate (Ph.D.) research program.

Public Health Relevance

The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and El Paso Community College (EPCC) propose to renew their partnership to promote the successful transition of minority (primarily Mexican-American) students with interests in biomedical/behavioral sciences from the community college to the university and to improve their completion of a baccalaureate degree. This will expand the current highly successful Bridges to the Baccalaureate Program between these two institutions. The specific aims of this proposal are the following: SPECIFIC AIM #1: To increase interest among minority students (primarily Mexican-Americans) in biomedical/behavioral sciences as a career and increase by 50% the applicant pool to the Bridges program. SPECIFIC AIM #2: To increase by 50% the transfer rate of Bridges participants to baccalaureate degrees in biomedical/behavioral sciences. SPECIFIC AIM #3: To transfer professional skills and fully describe career options in the biomedical/behavioral sciences to Bridges participants. SPECIFIC AIM #4: To significantly increase the percentage of transferred participants who complete a baccalaureate degree in biomedical/behavioral sciences. The ultimate goal of our proposal is to increase the influx of underrepresented minorities (mainly Hispanics) into biomedical/behavioral science careers and encourage them toward a graduate (Ph.D.) research program.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25GM049011-14
Application #
8502672
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-MORE-1 (BB))
Program Officer
Hamlet, Michelle R
Project Start
1992-09-30
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$206,355
Indirect Cost
$11,494
Name
University of Texas El Paso
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
132051285
City
El Paso
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
79968
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