The goal of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity program (UNC-IMSD) program is to increase the number of under-represented minority scientists that attain PhDs in biomedical disciplines and continue on to successful scientific careers. Now, more than ever, our country must invest in training the next generation of scientists if we are to compete in the global economy. It is imperative that the next generation of scientists draw upon our whole population - including minorities and other historically disadvantaged and underserved populations. Our UNC-IMSD program will provide under-represented minority graduate students the academic assistance and supportive community required for their success. Our program will emphasize standards of excellence and provide superlative training in developing scientific networks, research collaborations and preparation of scientific manuscripts and fellowship proposals. The UNC-IMSD program will develop partnership with other NIH funded training programs on campus to promote synergy. By establishing a standard of excellence and partnerships with prestigious NIH training grants, our program will improve the climate for all URM students both in individual labs and in the scientific community at the university. Public Health Relevance Statement: The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (UNC-IMSD) will provide superlative training to our next generation of biomedical scientists. The program will focus on recruiting and training a diverse group of scientists to insure multiple viewpoints are contributing to our future. UNC-IMSD will achieve this by providing academic assistance, the supportive community required for success, and professional and career development training.

Public Health Relevance

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity (UNC-IMSD) will provide superlative training to our next generation of biomedical scientists. The program will focus on recruiting and training a diverse group of scientists to insure multiple viewpoints are contributing to our future. UNC-IMSD will achieve this by providing academic assistance, the supportive community required for success, and professional and career development training.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25GM055336-14
Application #
8449638
Study Section
Minority Programs Review Committee (MPRC)
Program Officer
Janes, Daniel E
Project Start
1996-09-30
Project End
2014-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$608,569
Indirect Cost
$41,088
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Genetics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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