Located on the south-side of Chicago, Chicago State University (CSU) is a public liberal arts institution with a predominantly African-American student body. CSU serves the highest proportion of black students of all public universities in the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa-Wisconsin contiguous four-state region where it awards the largest number of baccalaureate degree to this population. As an urban comprehensive university, CSU faces both the opportunity and the challenge of educating students who are mostly raised and educated within a ten-mile radius of the campus and are products of both an economically- disadvantaged background and high-school education which has not prepared them for college-level work. The CSU MBRS RISE Program is a response to the NIH initiative to increase the numbers of under-represented minorities in leadership positions in the biomedical sciences. The Program consists of hierarchical undergraduate training activities within the departments of Biological Sciences and Chemistry and Physics that will prepare students for PhD-level studies and biomedical research careers. By the completion of the program students will have: (i) had several real research experiences, (ii) written, defended and executed a hypothesis-driven research plan, (iii) prepared and delivered at least one presentation at a regional or national research conference, (iv) participated in a grant application review panel, (v) completed at least an academic semester of service as a peer teacher in entry-level courses in their discipline which will provide training and perspective for their future role as TAs in graduate school, and (vi) developed competitive applications for graduate programs. The quantitative goal of the program is to achieve a minimum of seven students per year admitted to graduate programs (Ph.D. or PhD-bridge) during each of the first three years of funding and to increase this annual productivity by the fourth. The qualitative goals are to (i) increase student awareness of careers in biomedical research (ii) provide students with hands-on research experiences, (iii) assist students to develop competitive graduate-school applications, and (iv) provide support for a community of research scholars in the participating departments. The CSU RISE Program, along with the SCORE Program and other externally-funded research programs are designed in concert to provide expanded resources for students to train for biomedical research careers. The funding of the RISE Program will accelerate the realization of the institutional goal of becoming a major focal point of opportunities for under-represented minorities in biomedical training in the Chicago metropolitan area. Public Health Relevance: Located on the south-side of Chicago, Chicago State University (CSU) is a public liberal arts institution with a predominantly African-American student body. The CSU MBRS RISE Program is a response to the NIH initiative to increase the numbers of under-represented minorities in leadership positions in the biomedical sciences. The Program consists of hierarchical undergraduate training activities within the departments of Biological Sciences and Chemistry and Physics that will prepare students for PhD-level studies and biomedical research careers. By the completion of the program students will have: (i) had several real research experiences, (ii) written, defended and executed a hypothesis-driven research plan, (iii) prepared and delivered at least one presentation at a regional or national research conference, (iv) participated in a grant application review panel, (v) completed at least an academic semester of service as a peer teacher in entry-level courses in their discipline which will provide training and perspective for their future role as TAs in graduate school, and (vi) developed competitive applications for graduate programs. The quantitative goal of the program is to achieve a minimum of seven students per year admitted to graduate programs (Ph.D. or PhD-bridge) during each of the first three years of funding and to increase this annual productivity by the fourth. The qualitative goals are to (i) increase student awareness of careers in biomedical research (ii) provide students with hands-on research experiences, (iii) assist students to develop competitive graduate-school applications, and (iv) provide support for a community of research scholars in the participating departments.

Public Health Relevance

Located on the south-side of Chicago, Chicago State University (CSU) is a public liberal arts institution with a predominantly African-American student body. The CSU MBRS RISE Program is a response to the NIH initiative to increase the numbers of under-represented minorities in leadership positions in the biomedical sciences. The Program consists of hierarchical undergraduate training activities within the departments of Biological Sciences and Chemistry and Physics that will prepare students for PhD-level studies and biomedical research careers. By the completion of the program students will have: (i) had several real research experiences, (ii) written, defended and executed a hypothesis-driven research plan, (iii) prepared and delivered at least one presentation at a regional or national research conference, (iv) participated in a grant application review panel, (v) completed at least an academic semester of service as a peer teacher in entry-level courses in their discipline which will provide training and perspective for their future role as TAs in graduate school, and (vi) developed competitive applications for graduate programs. The quantitative goal of the program is to achieve a minimum of seven students per year admitted to graduate programs (Ph.D. or PhD-bridge) during each of the first three years of funding and to increase this annual productivity by the fourth. The qualitative goals are to (i) increase student awareness of careers in biomedical research (ii) provide students with hands-on research experiences, (iii) assist students to develop competitive graduate-school applications, and (iv) provide support for a community of research scholars in the participating departments.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25GM059218-11
Application #
8080877
Study Section
Minority Programs Review Committee (MPRC)
Program Officer
Zlotnik, Hinda
Project Start
1999-09-01
Project End
2013-05-31
Budget Start
2011-06-01
Budget End
2012-05-31
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$262,351
Indirect Cost
Name
Chicago State University
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
108109182
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60628
Niklas, Jens; Westwood, Mark; Mardis, Kristy L et al. (2015) X-ray Crystallographic, Multifrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of the Ni(P(Cy)2N(tBu)2)2(n+) Hydrogen Oxidation Catalyst in the Ni(I) Oxidation State. Inorg Chem 54:6226-34
Mardis, Kristy L; Webb, Jeremy N; Holloway, Tarita et al. (2015) Electronic Structure of Fullerene Acceptors in Organic Bulk-Heterojunctions: A Combined EPR and DFT Study. J Phys Chem Lett 6:4730-5
Niklas, Jens; Mardis, Kristy L; Banks, Brian P et al. (2013) Highly-efficient charge separation and polaron delocalization in polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunctions: a comparative multi-frequency EPR and DFT study. Phys Chem Chem Phys 15:9562-74
Darji, Ketur; Miglis, Cristina; Wardlow, Ashley et al. (2013) HPLC determination of isoflavone levels in osage orange from the Midwest and southern United States. J Agric Food Chem 61:6806-11
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Mardis, Kristy L; Sutton, Heather M; Zuo, Xiaobing et al. (2009) Solution-state conformational ensemble of a hexameric porphyrin array characterized using molecular dynamics and X-ray scattering. J Phys Chem A 113:2516-23
Gerin, Christine; Teilhac, Jean-Rene; Smith, Kristin et al. (2008) Motor activity induces release of serotonin in the dorsal horn of the rat lumbar spinal cord. Neurosci Lett 436:91-5
Bowen, Samuel P; Mancini, Jay D; Fessatidis, Vassilios et al. (2008) Why do electromagnetic pulses enhance bone growth? Ann Biomed Eng 36:195-203

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