Increasing the number of students from underrepresented (UR) groups in biomedical and behavioral research who enter and complete Ph.D. programs is the major goal of RISE. Since 2000, the Hunter College RISE Research Development Program has contributed since 42 UR undergraduate participants have entered PhD or MD/PhD programs (13 have completed and entered post doctoral study) and 37 UR graduate students completed PhDs and most entered post doctoral training. Moreover, ten students have joined the professoriate. Based on surpassing most national RISE program objectives in the current cycle, we propose an improved and expanded program for Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Psychology undergraduate (UG, 20 total), masters (5) and PhD (20) majors. This program was developed from evaluation, mentor and administrator inputs and support from new college initiatives. Program objectives have been raised: 80% of UGs and MS students will, upon graduation, enter PhD Programs and 90% of PhD students will graduate and enter post doctoral programs, all at research intensive universities. To achieve these objectives, we made changes and additions to ensure that UGs will be better candidates for PhD programs and ready to apply as seniors. We have also developed state of the art professional development tools and instituted mechanisms to monitor and support adherence and achievement. Students will continue to receive research experiences in laboratories engaged in nationally funded, competitive, state of the art, biomedical science research and UGs are required to spend one summer at an external research program;however, the enhanced program involves more intensive mentoring and evaluation by faculty mentors and professional development coordinator for both UGs and Graduate students. Both will attend RISE classes which promote research skills, professional development and instill knowledge for responsible conduct of research. Graduate students also receive extensive assistance in writing and verbal skills, critical thinking and use of on-line networking tools and are required to submit grants and research papers. Graduate students will also prepare annual Individual Developmental Plans (IDP). We will utilize new tools and programs initiated by the college that monitor and track STEM students and the services of the newly appointed college evaluator. Our Program also developed new tools through an ARRA supplement. The RISE Information and Tracking by Access system provides storage of program data required by NIGMS, information for program evaluation, and a tracking mechanism for all graduates. Another on-line resource allows posting of student documents which are available for mentors and RISE personnel for review and editing. With these tools, we can quickly determine whether students are progressing to meet intermediate milestones and overall goals and adjust if they are not. Finally, we will continue to institutionalize RISE initiatives and expand opportunities to all STEM students in order to enhance research at the college and to further NIH goals.

Public Health Relevance

Undergraduate college students and graduate students (enrolled in masters and Ph.D. programs) will receive research training in biomedical and behavioral areas. Thus, this program will educate and train the next generation of scientists who engage in research to benefit public health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
2R25GM060665-13
Application #
8266793
Study Section
Minority Programs Review Committee (MPRC)
Program Officer
Broughton, Robin Shepard
Project Start
2000-03-01
Project End
2017-03-31
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-03-31
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$1,418,439
Indirect Cost
$101,070
Name
Hunter College
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
620127915
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10065
Valderrama, Jorge; Miranda, Regina; Jeglic, Elizabeth (2016) Ruminative subtypes and impulsivity in risk for suicidal behavior. Psychiatry Res 236:15-21
Jacome, Luis F; Barateli, Ketti; Buitrago, Dina et al. (2016) Gonadal Hormones Rapidly Enhance Spatial Memory and Increase Hippocampal Spine Density in Male Rats. Endocrinology 157:1357-62
Luine, Victoria (2016) Estradiol: Mediator of memories, spine density and cognitive resilience to stress in female rodents. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 160:189-95
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Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Amador, Nicole; Abrams, Lisa et al. (2015) Estrogen alters baseline and inflammatory-induced cytokine levels independent from hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity. Cytokine 72:121-9
Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Jurska, Justyna; Quiñones, Victoria et al. (2015) Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts. Arch Suicide Res 19:350-65

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