Within the past decade, clinical psychology and psychiatry professional organizations have embraced the evidence supported treatments (ESTs) for specific mental disorders. In fact, recommendations as well as requirements to provide training in ESTs and/or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have become a part of accreditation guidelines for these professional groups. A recent survey (Weissman et al., 2006) noted that despite the importance of offering training in scientifically validated psychotherapies, very few programs in any discipline incorporate both didactic education coupled with supervision in these approaches to treatment. One consequence of limited training opportunities is that there are an insufficient number of individuals in the community who are skilled in the delivery of these treatments. Further, it is likely that specialty services, such as treatment for anxiety disorders, count even fewer practitioners who have had adequate training among their numbers. Manuals that address methods for treating anxiety disorders have been available for some time. However, it is not sufficient that a clinician simply follow the manual or be able to apply a set of "how to" instructions. In order to be proficient in the delivery of ESTs, it is critical that training is theory driven and has its foundation in the overarching principles of evidence based research. Training of this nature is especially important as the diverse populations likely to be seen by most clinicians vary considerably from subjects in randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) on whom manualized treatments are generally based. The purpose of this application is to improve upon and expand our current training curriculum for psychology interns and psychiatry residents. While clinical science is already stressed, greater importance will be placed on research with small, often N = 1, samples that form the underpinnings for evidence based treatment. Considerable emphasis will be placed on how such treatments can be generalized to anxiety clinic patients whose symptoms are often more multifaceted than those of patients recruited for RCTs. Both interns and residents will continue to receive training and supervision in CBT for anxiety disorders;however, training in evidence based assessment will be added to the curriculum. In addition to making important changes to and/or restructuring several of our seminars, we will add a research-based anxiety/CBT case seminar for interns and residents that will also require a year-long, collaborative clinical research project.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25MH084781-05
Application #
8269924
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-D (09))
Program Officer
Kozak, Michael J
Project Start
2008-09-26
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$30,364
Indirect Cost
$2,249
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612