The Baylor Neurosurgery Residency Program has been in place for over fifty years, and has long been one of the nation's largest and most well respected neurosurgical training programs. The program has always had a solid academic tradition, and graduates have served as faculty at many leading medical schools. Beginning in 2006, the program was retooled to substantially enhance its ability to train the next generation of academic neurosurgeons. In addition to developing a culture that emphasizes evidence-based practice, clinical and basic research, and didactic training in basic neuroscience underlying neurosurgical practice, the program was expanded by a full year in order to provide residents with a deeper and more meaningful research experience that will help prepare them for an academic career. The Baylor Research Education Program in Neurosurgery will carefully develop and oversee a full year dedicated to research, and will also integrate research education into the full seven year program. The hallmark of the resident research experience will be the twelve-month research block during the fourth year of the residency. To maximize research productivity, residents will also have a four-month research block in the preceding year to plan a project, write a research proposal, and begin data collection. Residents will also have an additional four- month research block during the year that follows the dedicated research year, in order to wrap up their projects, complete any remaining data analysis, and finish writing up manuscripts for publication. This presents a substantial commitment to research with a total of 20 months of protected research time. The primary goal of this research education program is to provide Neurosurgery residents with the opportunity to complete a cohesive, significant research project during their residency training. The program will mentor residents through the entire research process, from project conception to experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, and finally, to publication of results. This hands-on approach is the most effective way to prepare young clinician scientists for a productive research career by allowing them to conduct research independently, but with enough support to avoid the common pitfalls experienced by young researchers. This mentored project will also provide the resident with a foundation of data and expertise from which to build an independent research program and apply for research funding. This Program is therefore designed to provide a substantial level of oversight, while still ensuring flexibility for each resident to design his or her own research project. The Program is comprised of both research and educational plans for participants as well as formalized mentorship procedures and will span all seven years of residency training.

Public Health Relevance

The primary goal of this research education program is to provide Neurosurgery residents with the opportunity to complete a cohesive, significant research project during their residency training. The program will mentor residents through the entire research process, from project conception to experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, and finally, to publication of results. This hands-on approach is the most effective way to prepare the next generation of young clinician scientists for a productive research career in Neurosurgery, Neuroscience, or Neuro-oncology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25NS070694-03
Application #
8238359
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZNS1-SRB-S (20))
Program Officer
Korn, Stephen J
Project Start
2010-04-01
Project End
2015-03-31
Budget Start
2012-04-01
Budget End
2013-03-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$1
Indirect Cost
Name
Baylor College of Medicine
Department
Neurosurgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
051113330
City
Houston
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
77030
Menichella, Daniela Maria; Abdelhak, Belmadani; Ren, Dongjun et al. (2014) CXCR4 chemokine receptor signaling mediates pain in diabetic neuropathy. Mol Pain 10:42