Vietnam is experiencing two epidemics - injection drug use and HIV. Most young injection drug users (IDU) have daily family contact or live with their family, and the burden on the family is substantial, even greater if the IDU is HIV+. It is the families'support and coping that determines how well the IDU meets four lifelong challenges: to improve physical and mental health;to reduce or manage drug use behaviors;to reduce sexual risk;and to maintain positive family relationships. We hypothesize that with assistance, families can be part of the solution for both HIV- and HIV+ IDU. In this study, we propose an intervention pilot study that will develop and evaluate a family intervention to improve outcomes over time for IDU and their families in Vietnam. The proposed study is a collaborative effort between UCLA and Vietnam National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE) and will proceed in two phases. In Phase 1, with in-depth interviews and a focus group, we will get qualitative data on: 1) the perceived social, behavioral, health and mental health challenges for HIV- and HIV+ IDU;2) family burden of drug use and HIV;3) desirable intervention delivery formats;and 4) feasible strategies for improving services and care to HIV+ IDU. Based on the findings, we will develop a Vietnamese- specific family intervention for IDU and their families and review intervention contents and delivery strategies to ensure the program will be culturally appropriate and acceptable. In Phase 2, we will pilot the intervention in Phu Tho, Vietnam. Both HIV+ (n=40) and HIV- IDU (n=40) will be recruited through two drug rehabilitation centers in Phu Tho. Each IDU participant will be asked for consent to recruit a family member (n=80). We will then pilot the intervention by comparing the adjustment of IDU and their family members over 3 and 6 months, who are randomly assigned to receive either: 1) a family intervention;or 2) the standard care.

Public Health Relevance

HIV infection is rising exponentially in Vietnam, primarily among injection drug users (IDU), creating a window of opportunity to intervene with IDU before HIV reaches the general population. Most IDU in Vietnam have daily family contact or live with their family, and the psychosocial burdens on the family members are substantial and the families'support and coping determines how well IDU can manage their challenges. We propose an intervention pilot study that will develop and evaluate a family intervention to improve outcomes over time for IDU and their families in Vietnam.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Planning Grant (R34)
Project #
5R34DA029493-02
Application #
8110671
Study Section
Behavioral and Social Consequences of HIV/AIDS Study Section (BSCH)
Program Officer
Jenkins, Richard A
Project Start
2010-07-15
Project End
2013-06-30
Budget Start
2011-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$291,766
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Los Angeles
Department
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
092530369
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90095
Lee, Sung-Jae; Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing et al. (2015) Challenges facing HIV-positive persons who use drugs and their families in Vietnam. AIDS Care 27:283-7
Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Lin, Chunqing et al. (2014) An intervention to improve mental health and family well-being of injecting drug users and family members in Vietnam. Psychol Addict Behav 28:607-13
Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Liang, Li-Jung et al. (2014) Correlated outcomes of a pilot intervention for people injecting drugs and their family members in Vietnam. Drug Alcohol Depend 134:348-354
Li, Li; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Liang, Li-Jung et al. (2013) Mental health and family relations among people who inject drugs and their family members in Vietnam. Int J Drug Policy 24:545-9