The objective of the proposed research is to examine the impact of a cancer diagnosis on physical and cognitive functioning among older cancer survivors based on longitudinal data from the NIA-funded Health and Retirement Study. Public use HRS data from ten waves (1992-2010) will be linked to restricted HRS cancer data to identify respondents newly diagnosed with cancer and to form cohorts by major types of cancer. Data on sociodemographics, co-morbidities, and health behaviors, will be used to assess differences in physical and cognitive functioning exhibited at subsequent time points among cancer survivors and compared to persons with no history of cancer, to help separate the effects of cancer from the normal effects of aging. These data will be linked to the HRS Medicare Claims and Summary Data (2007) to identify extent of disease and treatment modality(s). Multilevel modeling and logistic regression models will be used to examine change over time and the association between predictors and patterns of change. This research will test the hypothesis that the diagnosis of cancer has a significant negative effect on physical and cognitive functioning separate from the normal effects of aging. We hypothesize that the risk of adverse changes in physical and cognitive functioning after a cancer diagnosis is influenced by various treatment-related factors as well as by socioeconomic and health factors present before and/or after diagnosis. Insight gained from the proposed project will improve our understanding of the adverse physical and cognitive health outcomes following a cancer diagnosis in older adults and will inform interventions targeted at addressing both age-related and cancer-related consequences to improve the quality of life for long-term cancer survivors.

Public Health Relevance

Insight gained from the proposed project will improve our understanding of the adverse physical and cognitive health outcomes following a cancer diagnosis in older adults and will inform interventions targeted at addressing both age-related and cancer-related consequences to improve the quality of life for long-term cancer survivors. Findings from this project will also identify at-risk groups that would benefit from continued surveillance and long-term medical care to minimize the burden of cancer over the entire cancer trajectory.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Dissertation Award (R36)
Project #
1R36AG042608-01A1
Application #
8512508
Study Section
National Institute on Aging Initial Review Group (NIA)
Program Officer
Patmios, Georgeanne E
Project Start
2013-04-01
Project End
2015-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$67,893
Indirect Cost
$25,861
Name
University of Southern California
Department
None
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
072933393
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90089