A group of investigators at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC) request funds to purchase a Laser Capture Microdissection System. The instrument will be used to procure pure populations of cells out of complex tissues, necessary to isolate RNA and proteins for gene expression analyses. Projects participating are making important contributions to understanding development, puberty and aging, to treating metabolic diseases, obesity and diabetes, depression, alcoholism, vascular disease, infant respiratory deficiencies, to finding new contraceptive methods. After a careful market evaluation, ArcturusXT was selected as the most versatile system, capable to meet the very diverse needs of the participating users. The new instrument will be placed in the ONPRC's Imaging and Morphology Core and will thus take advantage of the expertise and organization of a well established and supported core. ONPRC commits to ensuring long term efficient use of the instrument by covering the costs of space remodeling, service contract and personnel salary. Any instrument time not used by the projects presented here will be available to other scientists at Oregon Health &Science University, the host university, as well as to the many national and international collaborators that ONPRC traditionally hosts, thereby extending the overall benefits.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)
Type
Biomedical Research Support Shared Instrumentation Grants (S10)
Project #
1S10RR027503-01
Application #
7793548
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-CB-Q (30))
Program Officer
Birken, Steven
Project Start
2010-05-20
Project End
2011-05-19
Budget Start
2010-05-20
Budget End
2011-05-19
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$222,650
Indirect Cost
Name
Oregon Health and Science University
Department
Type
Other Domestic Higher Education
DUNS #
096997515
City
Portland
State
OR
Country
United States
Zip Code
97239
Kreklywich, Craig N; Smith, Patricia P; Jones, Carmen Baca et al. (2014) Fluorescence-based laser capture microscopy technology facilitates identification of critical in vivo cytomegalovirus transcriptional programs. Methods Mol Biol 1119:217-37