The landmark Institute of Medicine report, Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States highlighted the importance of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and improved control for zoonotic infectious diseases in natural animal hosts - 60% of all human pathogens are directly transmitted from or emergent from animal reservoirs. Understanding the behavior of zoonotic pathogens, including mechanisms of persistence, evolution of virulence, and genetic change underlying transmission phenotypes, is now widely recognized as critically important to addressing emerging infections. In addition, the importance of zoonotic pathogens and normal microbial flora of animals in emergence, formation of reservoirs, and spread of antimicrobial resistance has been highlighted in recent reports by both CDC and WHO. The Infectious Diseases and Microbial Immunology Post-doctoral Training Program specifically prepares a scientific workforce prepared to and capable of addressing critical knowledge gaps in infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance. The Training Program focuses on the integrated training of two types of post-doctoral fellows: (i) clinically-trained veterinarians with either residency training or an MPH (3-5 years post-DVM); and (ii) recent PhD graduates with research experience in cell biology, genetics, epidemiology, immunology, or microbiology (0-2 years post-PhD). Training for those who enter the program with DVM degrees is guided by two principles: (i) a strong basic sciences foundation is indispensable and is attained with targeted coursework; and ii) a minimum of 3 years of dedicated research is required to build the basis for career progression to independence. Training for post-doctoral fellows with PhD degrees is tailored to their backgrounds but emphasizes research directed at critical knowledge gaps in zoonotic infectious diseases and/or antimicrobial resistance. As the Training Program recruits primarily entry-level post-doctoral fellows, 3 years of fellowship commitment is required. This integration provides a dynamic training environment where post-DVM fellows develop the basic research skills required to address and solve complex diseases while post-PhD fellows develop specific expertise with microbial pathogens and a broader and deeper understanding of the global health relevance and impact. Program data strongly supports that the Training Program is addressing a significant gap with strong demand and preparing both types of entry level fellows for successful careers.

Public Health Relevance

The landmark Institute of Medicine report, 'Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States' highlighted the importance of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and improved control for zoonotic infectious diseases in natural animal hosts - 60% of all human pathogens are directly transmitted from or emergent from animal reservoirs. Understanding the behavior of animal pathogens, including mechanisms of persistence, evolution of virulence and antimicrobial resistance, and genetic change underlying transmission phenotypes, is now widely recognized as critically important to addressing emerging infections. The Infectious Diseases and Microbial Immunology Post-doctoral Training Program specifically prepares a scientific workforce prepared to and capable of addressing critical knowledge gaps in infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AI007025-37
Application #
9272777
Study Section
Microbiology and Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee (MID)
Program Officer
Coomes, Stephanie
Project Start
1989-09-30
Project End
2020-06-30
Budget Start
2017-07-01
Budget End
2018-06-30
Support Year
37
Fiscal Year
2017
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Washington State University
Department
Veterinary Sciences
Type
Schools of Veterinary Medicine
DUNS #
041485301
City
Pullman
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
99164
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