The objective of the University of Iowa Immunology Postdoctoral Training Program is to produce outstanding independent immunologist investigators that will pursue successful academic careers. The core of the program is a 90% time commitment to immunology research experience under the supervision of a preceptor who is an outstanding immunology mentor with current external research funding. The program preceptors represent a broad range of basic research areas in molecular and cellular immunology. These 34 faculty, assigned as Mentors or Associate Mentors based on their postdoctoral training experience, represent 9 departments. They function within an immunology community of over 40 highly interactive immunology researchers. Sophisticated technologies are accessible to all trainees through Core Laboratories and trainees are exposed to cutting edge research technologies through formal interactions with our """"""""technical consultants"""""""". Trainees must hold a doctoral degree, such as an MD or PhD. Candidates are sought by nationwide advertising and recruitment from preceptor laboratories, with specific effort directed to discovering and recruiting women and underrepresented minorities. Application requires a project description, statement of career goals, interview with the Admissions Committee and recommendation letters. The main criterion for selection is the probability that the candidate will develop into a productive independent immunology investigator. Trainee progress and career development are formally tracked by a tailored Postdoctoral Advisory Committee for each trainee and by the opportunities offered by the Office of Postdoctoral Scholars. Trainees also are able to choose formal didactic and seminar courses from a rich immunology and molecular biology curriculum and also take the Responsible Conduct of Research course. They attend weekly Immunology Seminars, presented by faculty and by prominent guest immunologists, with whom they personally interact. Trainees are required to present their work in this seminar series each summer. The grant supports attendance at one scientific meeting each year. Trainees must submit at least one application for an individual fellowship for each year of funding. If this application is not funded but progress is satisfactory, two years of research training are normally supported. For a third year, candidates must compete with first year applicants. Five positions are requested.

Public Health Relevance

The objective of the University of Iowa Immunology Postdoctoral Training Program is to produce outstanding independent immunologist investigators that will pursue successful academic careers. The core of the program is a 90% time commitment to immunology research experience under the supervision of a funded participating faculty member who is an outstanding researcher.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AI007260-27
Application #
8495200
Study Section
Allergy & Clinical Immunology-1 (AITC)
Program Officer
Prograis, Lawrence J
Project Start
1984-09-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
27
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$310,748
Indirect Cost
$23,018
Name
University of Iowa
Department
Microbiology/Immun/Virology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
062761671
City
Iowa City
State
IA
Country
United States
Zip Code
52242
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