The goal of our program is to provide a unique postdoctoral training environment for exercise scientists and rehabilitation specialists that integrates innovative basic research with clinical applications. To accomplish this goal, we have created a unique training program that consists of four main elements. The first is a strong commitment to an integrative and translational approach that focuses on key issues related to exercise science. This is evidenced by the interactions across our Molecular Physiology and Systemic Physiology Cores. Second, we have world renowned Program Faculty who have well-funded on-going research programs, which will provide the fellows with rich research experiences. Third, we have developed a robust Education Core that consists of: i) a unique Formal Didactics Program;ii) an innovative Clinical Application Core that gives postdoctoral fellows extensive clinical experience;and iii) an enhanced emphasis on responsible conduct of research. Finally, the U.C. Irvine ICTS gives postdoctoral fellows a powerful platform for performing translational research. New components of the training program include the UC Irvine FASt program, iTeach, and the Mock Study Section. We have leveraged resources of the UC Irvine ICTS to develop our FASt program, which is specifically designed for this training program and emphasizes new and emerging scientific techniques in genetics and imaging and provides instruction on issues related to good laboratory practices. This latter consideration is important with respect to the ever growing regulatory hurdles faced by the scientific community. The objective of Grants 101 and the K-Kiosk is to enhance the grantsmanship of our fellows and to make them more competitive in obtaining funding and applying for academic positions. The iTeach program was developed to enhance the teaching skills of our fellows, something that is rarely addressed in training programs of this nature but is desperately needed given that many top tier 1 research institutions are placing an ever growing emphasis on teaching skills. Finally, we have augmented our Grants 101 and the K-Kiosk to enhance the grantsmanship of our fellows and to make them more competitive in obtaining funding and applying for academic positions.

Public Health Relevance

In an aging population such as exists in the United States, sedentary lifestyles contribute to a variety of diseases and disabilities including sarcopenia, osteoporosis, heart and vascular disease, and type II diabetes. Recent epidemiological studies reveal disturbing associations between lack of exercise and increased incidence of certain cancers. Moreover, in children, there is an unparalleled epidemic of obesity clearly related to declining levels of physical activity early in life. The potential role of exercise as therapy has gained steady acceptance among health care professionals and the general public. But a mechanistic understanding of how exercise works in specific diseases and conditions is still lacking. Without knowledge at this level, rational and appropriate uses of exercise will remain imprecise, and the effectiveness of physical activity as a means to benefit human health may be lost. How can we best train the next generation of scientists in this area who must specialize in order to compete successfully in their individual scientific endeavors, but generalize in order to translate laboratory discoveries into solutions of real problems of human health? One approach is a training program that emphasizes both integrative and translational themes. Hence, we have created a unique training program that consists of four main elements. The first is a strong commitment to an integrative and translational approach that focuses on key issues related to exercise science. This is evidenced by the interactions across our Molecular Physiology and Systemic Physiology Cores. Second, we have world renowned Program Faculty who have well-funded on-going research programs, which will provide the fellows with rich research experiences. Third, we have developed a robust Education Core that consists of: i) a unique Formal Didactics Program;ii) an innovative Clinical Application Core that gives postdoctoral fellows extensive clinical experience;and iii) an enhanced emphasis on responsible conduct of research. Finally, the U.C. Irvine ICTS gives postdoctoral fellows a powerful platform for performing translational research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
2T32AR047752-11A1
Application #
8678679
Study Section
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee (AMS)
Program Officer
Boyce, Amanda T
Project Start
2001-04-01
Project End
2019-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$186,544
Indirect Cost
$17,095
Name
University of California Irvine
Department
Orthopedics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
046705849
City
Irvine
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92697
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