The focus of the renewal of the Training Program in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide doctoral students with advanced training in biomedical research. The didactic portion of the Program provides an integrated, innovative and rigorous educational experience that has as its goal the repair or regeneration of human tissues and organs and the preservation of the quality of human health. Resources for the program come from a core of well-funded faculty in several departments/divisions at Thomas Jefferson University including Orthopaedic Surgery, Dermatology, Medicine, Surgery, Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Stem Cell Biology, Pathology and Cell Biology and the Rothman Institute. We request support for five predoctoral students in the 01-03 year of the grant and six students in the 04-05 years. There are six program objectives: (1) to integrate contemporary advances in cell, molecular, and developmental biology towards understanding tissue function;(2) to relate fundamental advances in the life sciences to contemporary issues in tissue engineering (3) to foster practical understandings of the pathophysiology of diseases of the skeleton;(4) to develop translational research by working closely with physicians in a clinical and surgical setting;(5) to implement translational research through interactions with scientists in the biotech industry and (6) to build a pipeline of talented individuals for careers in musculoskeletal research The didactic aspects of the training program are embedded in integrating developmental, cell and molecular biology;bioinformatics and functional genomics;tissue engineering and bioimaging;and translational medicine. So as to anchor the program in human disease, clinicians lecture in each of the major courses. By interacting frequently with surgeons who treat the ravages of disease, and by direct observation and discussion with faculty in the clinic and operating room, students develop an appreciation for health problems that are amenable to treatment by tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Development of translational research is furthered by collaboration with scientists at local biotech companies and laboratories. Against this background, students develop their dissertation research which provides the foundation for their future careers as independent, innovative scientific investigators.

Public Health Relevance

The focus of the renewal of the Training Program in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide doctoral students with advanced training in biomedical research, with special emphasis on diseases that afflict the skeleton. Against this background, students develop their dissertation research which provides the foundation for their future careers as independent, innovative scientific investigators.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AR052273-09
Application #
8662202
Study Section
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review Committee (AMS)
Program Officer
Wang, Fei
Project Start
2005-04-01
Project End
2016-05-31
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$228,458
Indirect Cost
$11,070
Name
Thomas Jefferson University
Department
Orthopedics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
053284659
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19107
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