This is a proposal to renew a T32 grant to support training for eight physicians committed to a career in cancer research. The goal of this program is to train the next generation of physician scientists in medical, surgical, and radiation oncolog in both fundamental and advanced methods of cancer research, strengthening the ties between the laboratory and clinic. The program is multi-specialty and multidisciplinary in its orientation and governance, and includes laboratories and mentors that represent all of the clinical subspecialties of cancer and a broad array of research interests. The program emphasizes the importance of translating new findings in the fields of cancer biology, genetics, experimental therapeutics, immunology, molecular imaging, outcomes and epidemiology into useful clinical application. The pool of candidates is derived primarily from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) clinical residency and fellowship programs in medical oncology, radiation oncology, and surgery. The quality of these candidates is outstanding. The mentors are similarly outstanding, and have outstanding records of mentoring, research, funding and collaboration. The mentors are based mainly at the MGH Cancer Center, but are also from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and member institutions of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC). Mentors interact extensively through their research collaborations and participation in the cancer center. This training program and the cancer center are built on the cornerstone of integrating laboratory, clinical, and population science research through disease-based programs which have been established for each type of cancer. The program provides both project-oriented research experience and complementary didactic education for trainees. A high priority is placed on careful monitoring of trainees'progress by the program Director and Co-director, the Executive Committee, and individual mentors, including regular written reports from the trainees and mentors. The track record of former program trainees serves as a strong endorsement of the quality of this program. The program actively recruits women and minority candidates, and new mechanisms have been implemented to enhance these efforts.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of this program is to train the next generation of physician scientists in medical, surgical , and radiation oncology in both fundamental and advanced methods of cancer research, strengthening the ties between the laboratory and clinic. The program is multi-specialty and multidisciplinary in its orientation and governance, and includes laboratories and mentors that represent all of the clinical subspecialties of cancer and a broad array of research interests. The program emphasizes the importance of translating new findings in the fields of cancer biology, genetics, experimental therapeutics, immunology, molecular imaging, outcomes and epidemiology into useful clinical application.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32CA071345-17
Application #
8511577
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Damico, Mark W
Project Start
1997-08-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
17
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$453,533
Indirect Cost
$36,528
Name
Massachusetts General Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
073130411
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02199
Juric, Dejan; Castel, Pau; Griffith, Malachi et al. (2015) Convergent loss of PTEN leads to clinical resistance to a PI(3)K? inhibitor. Nature 518:240-4
Wheat, Justin C; Krause, Daniela S; Shin, Thomas H et al. (2014) The corepressor Tle4 is a novel regulator of murine hematopoiesis and bone development. PLoS One 9:e105557
Kulu, Y; Kawasaki, H; Donahue, J M et al. (2013) Concurrent chemotherapy inhibits herpes simplex virus-1 replication and oncolysis. Cancer Gene Ther 20:133-40
Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin et al. (2013) AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/*-catenin signaling pathway. Blood 121:4906-16
Meirelles, Katia; Benedict, Leo Andrew; Dombkowski, David et al. (2012) Human ovarian cancer stem/progenitor cells are stimulated by doxorubicin but inhibited by Mullerian inhibiting substance. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:2358-63
Sanchez, Carlos E; Tierney, Travis S; Gale, John T et al. (2011) Recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 pseudotypes: comparing safety, specificity, and transduction efficiency in the primate striatum. Laboratory investigation. J Neurosurg 114:672-80
Chang, Henry L; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Nicolaou, Fotini et al. (2011) Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits invasion and migration of epithelial cancer cell lines. Gynecol Oncol 120:128-34
Corcoran, Ryan B; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Bergethon, Kristin et al. (2010) BRAF gene amplification can promote acquired resistance to MEK inhibitors in cancer cells harboring the BRAF V600E mutation. Sci Signal 3:ra84
Chang, Henry L; Senaratne, Tharanga N; Zhang, Lihua et al. (2010) Uterine leiomyomas exhibit fewer stem/progenitor cell characteristics when compared with corresponding normal myometrium. Reprod Sci 17:158-67
Chang, Henry L; Pahlavan, Nima; Halpern, Elkan F et al. (2009) Serum Mullerian Inhibiting Substance/anti-Mullerian hormone levels in patients with adult granulosa cell tumors directly correlate with aggregate tumor mass as determined by pathology or radiology. Gynecol Oncol 114:57-60

Showing the most recent 10 out of 39 publications