This multi-disciplinary program will focus on training pre-doctoral students and post-doctoral fellows in Cancer Biology so that they can effectively decipher important research questions associated with human Cancer. To accomplish this objective, we have integrated the already established and successful programs in Signal Transduction and Mechanisms of Cancer Cell Survival, Cancer Progression and Metastasis, Tumor Microenvironment, and Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage with clinical exposure into one cohesive program. The trainees will receive both didactic and non-didactic instruction, laboratory-based basic science research training in cancer research and cutting edge clinical applications, and career development as independent cancer biologists. The students and fellows will receive ample training to articulate their ideas and communicate them effectively, evaluate biomedical research, and mentor others in scientific excellence, and thus function as important members of the scientific community. This program assembles a cohesive group of basic science and clinical faculty from 6 different departments at the College of Medicine. In the past 10 years our program faculty has trained 90 doctoral students and over 100 post-doctoral fellows, and has the experience and the interdisciplinary focus to guide this group of trainees to function in research teams pursuing multidisciplinary investigations. We mentor our trainees to be proficient at utilizing hypothesis-driven approaches as well as discovery-oriented research design to address key problems. All trainees are required to complete the foundation courses in graduate level Genetics, Biochemistry, Immunology, Pharmacology, Physiology, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Biostatistics, Ethics, and the Cancer Biology and Therapy course, which emphasizes cancer in the context of human disease. Training also involves participation in the Markey Cancer Center Seminar Series and a Cancer Biology Journal Club. A unique feature of this program is the interdisciplinary training opportunity that will emphasize bench to bedside (and vice versa) research topics to provide a bridge between the fundamental biology of cancer and clinical cancer. The ultimate objective is to develop a cadre of future scientists who can become leaders in integrative team approaches to understand the complex issue of cancer as it relates to potential prevention and treatment strategies. Moreover, to help ensure our commitment to the clinical-translation of basic science discoveries, Markey Cancer Center Associate Director Vivek Rangnekar, Ph.D. and Director Mark Evers, M.D., will be PIs for this team-based training program. The University of Kentucky places a significant emphasis on training of minority students, post-doctoral researchers and physicians, and therefore this program will ensure the inclusion of individuals with under-represented racial and ethnic background to better serve our diverse society. Accordingly, this training program will train the next generation of cancer researchers to better understand and treat cancers using an interdisciplinary team approach.

Public Health Relevance

This multidisciplinary training program represents a team-approach involving multiple PIs to mentor pre- doctoral students and post-doctoral fellows in fundamental aspects of cancer biology, translational science of cancer and therapeutics, and prepare them as independent investigators who can become fully integrated in multidisciplinary cancer care teams.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
3T32CA165990-02S2
Application #
8907401
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Lin, Alison J
Project Start
2013-04-01
Project End
2016-03-31
Budget Start
2014-04-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$34,550
Indirect Cost
$2,198
Name
University of Kentucky
Department
Radiation-Diagnostic/Oncology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
939017877
City
Lexington
State
KY
Country
United States
Zip Code
40506
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