The overall purpose of this training grant is to provide postdoctoral training to young basic scientists and physicians in the area of neurobiology of substance abuse, with a focus on the mode of action of psychostimulant and opiate drugs at the genetic, molecular, circuit and behavioral levels. Our objective is to provide an exciting and innovative environment with world class facilities and faculty to develop the next generation of scientists working in drug abuse. Training will take place in the multidisciplinary setting at the University of Michigan. The 17 faculty members are all NIDA grantees (or Co-Investigators) and have expertise in the neurobiology of substance abuse, with particular emphasis on the area of opioid and psychostimulant drugs. The focus of the proposal is the training of postdoctoral fellows in state-of-the-art approaches for studying mechanisms underlying abuse of psychoactive drugs. This includes studying the genetic, developmental and environmental factors that lead to vulnerability to substance abuse: the mode of action of drugs of abuse at the molecular, cellular, anatomical and behavioral levels;and the long-term consequences of psychoactive drugs on the brain, as mediated through mechanisms of neural plasticity, and the development of medications. The working assumption is that the functional and structural brain remodeling associated with chronic drug use lies at the basis of tolerance, sensitization, physical dependence, and psychological addiction to these drugs. The drug abuse research community at the University of Michigan is of high quality and has a long history in the field. Beyond their individual strengths, the training faculty members have long-term scientific and training relationships with each other. These historical strengths have recently been significantly enhanced with a number of initiatives at the University of Michigan, designed to facilitate life science research in general, and neuroscience research in particular. They include state-of-the-art tools for mouse and rat genetics, genomics, proteomics, and informatics. Thus, our postdoctoral fellows will profit from a highly sophisticated, yet supportive, research and training environment.

Public Health Relevance

This grant is designed to provide postdoctoral training to young basic scientists and physicians in the area of neurobiology of substance abuse, with a focus on the mode of action of psychostimulant and opiate drugs at the genetic, molecular, circuit and behavioral levels. The objective is to provide an exciting and innovative environment with world class facilities and faculty to develop the next generation of scientists working in dru abuse. These scientists will then have the skills to continue to study and work towards solving drug abuse thus supporting the mission of NIDA.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
2T32DA007268-21
Application #
8267965
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDA1-EXL-T (13))
Program Officer
Babecki, Beth
Project Start
1991-09-30
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$342,027
Indirect Cost
$25,335
Name
University of Michigan Ann Arbor
Department
Pharmacology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
073133571
City
Ann Arbor
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48109
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