This proposal requests funds for continuation of a training program in fundamental chemosensory research at Florida State University (FSU). Four positions at the predoctoral level and two positions at the postdoctoral level are requested. The FSU Neuroscience Program, within which this Chemosensory Training Program operates, has a long history of high quality training and research in sensory systems, especially the chemosensory systems. The training program at FSU is firmly focused on the search for fundamental scientific knowledge, on which all applied and clinical understanding must be based. It is characterized by a diversity of research perspectives among the associated faculty and a diversity of research methodologies even within a single investigator's laboratory. Thus, the program affords pre- and post-doctoral trainees with unusual opportunities to explore and master many research approaches to important questions about chemosensory function. And to do so under the guidance of well-respected faculty used to productive collaborations. The research approaches represented in the Program include electrophysiological, molecular, anatomical, and quantitative behavioral analysis. The research support facilities are also exceptional;for example, molecular biological, electronics, computer, electron/ confocal microscopy and photography facilities, with professional staff, are all available to program members and trainees. A highly distinguished new faculty member has joined the training program since the last competitive renewal and almost all program faculties now have new laboratory space in new buildings. The notable features of this program include its distinguished history and excellent faculty, its focus on basis mechanisms studied in depth and breadth, and the outstanding technical facilities available. Trainees have an opportunity to acquire the perspective that is necessary for success in pushing out the boundaries of knowledge, and advice and assistance in obtaining the skills necessary for a career in externally funded productive research.

Public Health Relevance

The training program at FSU is focused on the search for fundamental scientific knowledge, on which all applied and clinical understanding must be based. The program affords pre- and post-doctoral trainees with unusual opportunities to explore and master many research approaches to important questions about taste and smell function, whose loss involves devastating loss of quality of life, and whose central brain circuits are important in eating disorders, obesity, diabetes and hypertension;and perhaps other neurological disorders.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32DC000044-18
Application #
8269901
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDC1-SRB-L (45))
Program Officer
Sklare, Dan
Project Start
1995-07-01
Project End
2015-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
18
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$157,955
Indirect Cost
$12,531
Name
Florida State University
Department
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
790877419
City
Tallahassee
State
FL
Country
United States
Zip Code
32306
Schier, Lindsey A; Spector, Alan C (2016) Behavioral Evidence for More than One Taste Signaling Pathway for Sugars in Rats. J Neurosci 36:113-24
McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bell, Genevieve A; Cannon, Elisa N et al. (2016) Reversal Learning Deficits Associated with Increased Frontal Cortical Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Tyrosine Kinase B Signaling in a Prenatal Cocaine Exposure Mouse Model. Dev Neurosci :
Schier, Lindsey A; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C (2016) Bilateral lesions in a specific subregion of posterior insular cortex impair conditioned taste aversion expression in rats. J Comp Neurol 524:54-73
Westberry, Jenne M; Meredith, Michael (2016) GABAergic mechanisms contributing to categorical amygdala responses to chemosensory signals. Neuroscience 331:186-96
Torregrossa, A-M; Loney, G C; Smith, J C et al. (2015) Examination of the perception of sweet- and bitter-like taste qualities in sucralose preferring and avoiding rats. Physiol Behav 140:96-103
Blonde, Ginger D; Bales, Michelle B; Spector, Alan C (2015) Extensive lesions in rat insular cortex significantly disrupt taste sensitivity to NaCl and KCl and slow salt discrimination learning. PLoS One 10:e0117515
Bales, Michelle B; Schier, Lindsey A; Blonde, Ginger D et al. (2015) Extensive Gustatory Cortex Lesions Significantly Impair Taste Sensitivity to KCl and Quinine but Not to Sucrose in Rats. PLoS One 10:e0143419
Smith, Kimberly R; Spector, Alan C (2014) The importance of the presence of a 5'-ribonucleotide and the contribution of the T1R1 + T1R3 heterodimer and an additional low-affinity receptor in the taste detection of L-glutamate as assessed psychophysically. J Neurosci 34:13234-45
Thiebaud, Nicolas; Johnson, Melissa C; Butler, Jessica L et al. (2014) Hyperlipidemic diet causes loss of olfactory sensory neurons, reduces olfactory discrimination, and disrupts odor-reversal learning. J Neurosci 34:6970-84
Davidson, Terry L; Tracy, Andrea L; Schier, Lindsey A et al. (2014) A view of obesity as a learning and memory disorder. J Exp Psychol Anim Learn Cogn 40:261-79

Showing the most recent 10 out of 49 publications