The goal of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) Nutrition Training Grant is to train pre- doctoral students in integrative nutrition research so that they will become the future leaders in the basic and applied aspects of the science of nutrition. Given that 67% of American adults are overweight/obese and 17% of children are also obese, obesity and diabetes are a major focus of the UNC-CH Department of Nutrition. In addition, however, our faculty members have active research programs in the areas of cancer, brain development, genetics, immunology, nutritional influences on environmental contaminants and cardiovascular disease. We are thus well qualified to train scholars to pursue solutions to both the obesity/diabetes epidemic and to other critical problems in nutrition. Our training program provides a solid foundation for careers in academia by providing a strong core of instruction in nutritional biochemistry, metabolism, epidemiology, intervention programs and policy. Because the UNC-CH Department of Nutrition is uniquely located in both a School of Medicine and a School of Public Health, it focuses effectively on both the public health and medical science foundations of nutrition research;our pre-doctoral Trainees have the advantage of our collaborations across both public health and medical disciplines. The field of Nutrition demands broadly trained investigators who take an integrated approach that relates molecular events to behavior, population trends, and whole body metabolism. Nutrition scientists must understand not only the basic science that forms the foundation of nutrition, but also understand how foods and nutrients influence the health of populations and be able to lead the integration of nutritional concepts into evidence based interventions that impact human lives. Finally, training in the development and promotion of policy guidelines that link scientific research to the needs of the population with respect to diet and activity are also a component of the education of our graduate students. Our training program at UNC ensures that our graduates are broadly exposed to nutritional biochemistry, nutritional epidemiology and nutrition interventions and policy, culminating in a specialization in one of these three areas.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) Nutrition Training Grant is to train pre- doctoral students in integrative nutrition research so that they will become the future leaders in the basic and applied aspects of the science of nutrition. Our training program at UNC ensures that our graduates are broadly exposed to nutritional biochemistry, nutritional epidemiology and nutrition interventions and policy, culminating in a specialization in one of these three areas.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32DK007686-22
Application #
8706130
Study Section
Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases B Subcommittee (DDK)
Program Officer
Densmore, Christine L
Project Start
1992-09-30
Project End
2018-07-31
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$151,516
Indirect Cost
$8,856
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Nutrition
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Rummo, Pasquale E; Albrecht, Sandra S; Gordon-Larsen, Penny (2015) Field validation of food outlet databases: the Latino food environment in North Carolina, USA. Public Health Nutr 18:977-82
Mah, Amanda T; Van Landeghem, Laurianne; Gavin, Hannah E et al. (2014) Impact of diet-induced obesity on intestinal stem cells: hyperproliferation but impaired intrinsic function that requires insulin/IGF1. Endocrinology 155:3302-14
Poti, Jennifer M; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M (2014) Where are kids getting their empty calories? Stores, schools, and fast-food restaurants each played an important role in empty calorie intake among US children during 2009-2010. J Acad Nutr Diet 114:908-17
Johnston, R; Poti, J M; Popkin, B M (2014) Eating and aging: trends in dietary intake among older Americans from 1977-2010. J Nutr Health Aging 18:234-42
Poti, Jennifer M; Duffey, Kiyah J; Popkin, Barry M (2014) The association of fast food consumption with poor dietary outcomes and obesity among children: is it the fast food or the remainder of the diet? Am J Clin Nutr 99:162-71
Poti, Jennifer M; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M (2013) Solid fat and added sugar intake among U.S. children: The role of stores, schools, and fast food, 1994-2010. Am J Prev Med 45:551-9
Bidulescu, Aurelian; Chambless, Lloyd E; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria et al. (2009) Repeatability and measurement error in the assessment of choline and betaine dietary intake: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Nutr J 8:14
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Daniels, M C; Adair, L S; Popkin, B M et al. (2009) Dietary diversity scores can be improved through the use of portion requirements: an analysis in young Filipino children. Eur J Clin Nutr 63:199-208
Cernkovich, Erin R; Deng, Jianbei; Bond, Michael C et al. (2008) Adipose-specific disruption of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 increases body weight and adiposity. Endocrinology 149:1581-90

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