The goal of this doctoral and postdoctoral training program is to educate scientists who will provide insights into the causes and prevention of birth defects and functional abnormalities of prenatal origin. Graduate students are selected from among the Molecular and Developmental Biology (MDB) Graduate Program matriculants with interest in birth defects and/or neurobehavioral effects of prenatal origin. MDB students take core classes in developmental biology, molecular genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, and ethics in research;teratology students additionally take courses in teratology, biostatistics, and toxicology (recommended). Neuroteratology students additionally take courses in neuroscience. Postdoctoral trainees take the teratology and ethics in research courses. Postdoctoral trainees enter the Training Program by applying directly to training faculty members. All training faculty operate active, extramurall funded laboratories and all have experience training graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Current and past trainees show excellent research productivity, all attend national meetings annually, and all have secured good positions upon completion. All trainees in the last 10 years have remained in science;many have entered the private sector thereby helping to fill the national shortage of teratologists in industry. Four pre-doctoral and three postdoctoral positions are requested. During the current funding period, the program has had additional success attracting URM trainees;in addition, curriculum changes have strengthened training in molecular genetics, developmental biology, and developmental diseases;a new research building and core facilities became available and the MDB faculty has expanded to 85, with the training grant faculty expanding to 15, 5 of whom are new to the grant. More training investigators now investigate environmental agents than 5 years ago. This program fills a unique niche as the only NIEHS training grant in teratology, the only one with a molecular genetics emphasis, and the only one with major focus on brain development. Teratology is not a specialty with its own academic home;accordingly, training in molecular developmental biology and/or neurobiology in addition to teratology provides trainees with flexibility to enter scientifi careers in teratology, developmental toxicology, neurobehavioral teratology, developmental biology, or developmental neuroscience with equal facility. This renewal continues the strengths of the program from the past and adds new faculty and resources to move teratology training to the next level of understanding the prenatal origins of disorders and diseases. Public Health Relevance: This is a training grant to support 4 graduate students and 3 postdoctoral fellows per year for specialized research training in the study of the causes of birth defects (teratology) and brain disorders (neurobehavioral teratology);areas for which there is a national shortage of scientists. The program is unique in training scientists in field within a Graduate Program in Molecular and Developmental Biology in a major pediatric research center (Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation) with specific training in teratology, molecular genetics, developmental biology, toxicology, biostatistics, ethics, and neuroscience. Knowledge in this field is essential for understanding and preventing birth defects and prenatal neurobehavioral abnormalities from exposure to harmful environmental agents acting alone or in combination with other factors.

Public Health Relevance

This is a training grant to support 4 graduate students and 3 postdoctoral fellows per year for specialized research training in the study of the causes of birth defects (teratology) and brain disorders (neurobehavioral teratology);areas for which there is a national shortage of scientists. The program is unique in training scientists in field within a Graduate Program in Molecular and Developmental Biology in a major pediatric research center (Cincinnati Children's Research Foundation) with specific training in teratology, molecular genetics, developmental biology, toxicology, biostatistics, ethics, and neuroscience. Knowledge in this field is essential for understanding and preventing birth defects and prenatal neurobehavioral abnormalities from exposure to harmful environmental agents acting alone or in combination with other factors.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32ES007051-37
Application #
8500263
Study Section
Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee (EHS)
Program Officer
Shreffler, Carol K
Project Start
1977-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
37
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$248,077
Indirect Cost
$20,516
Name
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
071284913
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45229
Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Gutierrez, Arnold et al. (2015) Dopamine depletion in either the dorsomedial or dorsolateral striatum impairs egocentric Cincinnati water maze performance while sparing allocentric Morris water maze learning. Neurobiol Learn Mem 118:55-63
Vorhees, Charles V; Graham, Devon L; Braun, Amanda A et al. (2015) Prenatal immune challenge in rats: effects of polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid on spatial learning, prepulse inhibition, conditioned fear, and responses to MK-801 and amphetamine. Neurotoxicol Teratol 47:54-65
Williams, Michael T; Braun, Amanda A; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M et al. (2014) Kaolin-induced ventriculomegaly at weaning produces long-term learning, memory, and motor deficits in rats. Int J Dev Neurosci 35:7-15
Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M; Williams, Michael T; Braun, Amanda A et al. (2013) Neurobehavioral phenotype of C57BL/6J mice prenatally and neonatally exposed to cigarette smoke. Neurotoxicol Teratol 35:34-45
Ehrman, Lisa A; Mu, Xiuqian; Waclaw, Ronald R et al. (2013) The LIM homeobox gene Isl1 is required for the correct development of the striatonigral pathway in the mouse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:E4026-35
Chapman, Heather; Waclaw, Ronald R; Pei, Zhenglei et al. (2013) The homeobox gene Gsx2 controls the timing of oligodendroglial fate specification in mouse lateral ganglionic eminence progenitors. Development 140:2289-98
Schaefer, Tori L; Grace, Curtis E; Braun, Amanda A et al. (2013) Cognitive impairments from developmental exposure to serotonergic drugs: citalopram and MDMA. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 16:1383-94
Braun, Amanda A; Graham, Devon L; Schaefer, Tori L et al. (2012) Dorsal striatal dopamine depletion impairs both allocentric and egocentric navigation in rats. Neurobiol Learn Mem 97:402-8
Chen, Y; Curran, C P; Nebert, D W et al. (2012) Effect of vitamin C deficiency during postnatal development on adult behavior: functional phenotype of Gulo-/- knockout mice. Genes Brain Behav 11:269-77
Schaefer, T L; Braun, A A; Amos-Kroohs, R M et al. (2012) A new model of Pde4d deficiency: genetic knock-down of PDE4D enzyme in rats produces an antidepressant phenotype without spatial cognitive effects. Genes Brain Behav 11:614-22

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