This proposal is to renew Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis (T32 ES-09250-20). It is a fairly large training program due to an NIEHS-directed merger of two smaller training programs, one in toxicology and the other with a more genetic bent. ThePrcjgram has retained its diverse research interests, which has proven extremely valuable. Trainees withtoxicc>logy backgrounds discuss research genetics or molecular biology. The consequence has been an inevital)le cross-fertilizationof ideas and approaches. The major emphasis of the program remains the impact of environmental exposure on the genesis of disease, particularly cancer and pulmonary dysfunction, using molecular, genetic and toxicological approaches, Participating faculty derive from six different deoartments, including the Departments of Cell and Cancer Biology, Environmental Health, Molecular Genetics, Genome Sciences, Surgery and Dermatology, Nationally, the Program fulfills a need to train individuals at the pre- and postdoctoral levels in disciplines relating to biological, oncological and toxicological consequences of environmental exposure. Institutionally, the Program has brought research efforts of sei/eral laboratories into a common focus in areas of exposure and environmental health, and has facilitatedccjllaborative efforts between these laboratories. Thus, the Program encourages trainees to engage in restjarch that combines the expertise of several laboratories, These interactions are facilitated by our biweekly journal club meetings where trainees alternatively present a topical paper or present their data. Our interd sciplinary approach provides the trainees with a broader- based background than is otherwise available, Predoctoral trainees all have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in a chemical, biological cr physical science with superior academic achievements and many have won awards and recognition while iti theprogram. Postdoctoral candidates are selected based on proven academic accomplishments and hole1 the degrees of Ph.D., D.V.M. or M.D. Pre- and postdoctoral trainees are selected from a national pool of applicants. This renewal application requests predoctoral (8) and postdoctoral (4) positions. This programmatic size is optimal for the number of preceptors, the number of departments, and the extensive resources avai able to the trainees.

Public Health Relevance

Understanding environmental contributions to cancer rates requires cross-training in environmental health sciences, toxicology methods, and mechanisms of mutation. This program will train graduate students and post-doctoral fellows, giving them the expertise they need to make advances in the fields of environment and cancer, ultimately leading to a better understanding of environmental contributions to human disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
3T32ES007250-25S1
Application #
8890553
Study Section
Environmental Health Sciences Review Committee (EHS)
Program Officer
Shreffler, Carol K
Project Start
1988-07-01
Project End
2015-06-30
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
25
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Cincinnati
Department
Anatomy/Cell Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45221
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