The Stanford Biophysics Program is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental predoctoral training program for students with backgrounds and interests in the physical sciences and their application to biology. The Program faculty members come from departments in the Schools of Humanities and Sciences, Medicine, Engineering, and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Student training and research centers on the application of physical and chemical principles and methods to solving biological problems, and the development of new methods. The major areas of modern biophysics are represented in the Program, principally the molecular basis of macromolecular function including structural biology, single molecule analysis, and computational biology. The quantitative relationship between molecular properties and higher- level cell and tissue properties, and research in emerging areas of quantitative cell and organ biology, are also well represented. The philosophy of the training program is to develop students with strong quantitative approaches to biological problems, while also developing their perspective in choosing forefront biological problems. There are approximately 30 trainees in the Program, most with undergraduate backgrounds in physical science, biochemistry, or engineering. A balanced academic program tailored to the diverse backgrounds of the students and an acceptable level of performance is insured by first year advising by the Program Director, and annual meetings with the thesis committee. The program requires graduate-level coursework in physical and biological sciences, participation in seminar series, and most importantly the development of a high level of proficiency in independent research. The program trains researchers who apply quantitative methods to understanding the properties of biomolecules, cells, and tissues. This basic research is the cornerstone for developing drugs targeted to specific molecules, understanding the relationships between environmental stimuli and cell and tissue behavior, and developing new methods for detection and treatment of diseases including cancer and neurological pathologies.

Public Health Relevance

The Stanford Biophysics Program is an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental predoctoral training program for students with backgrounds and interests in the physical sciences and their application to biology. This basic research is the cornerstone for developing drugs targeted to specific molecules, understanding the relationships between environmental stimuli and cell and tissue behavior, and developing new methods for detection and treatment of diseases including cancer and neurological pathologies.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32GM008294-26
Application #
8683181
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1)
Program Officer
Flicker, Paula F
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
26
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Stanford University
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94304
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