This is a competitive renewal application for T32 support for early graduate training in the neurosciences at the University of Virginia. The Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) at the University of Virginia is an interdepartmental program that offers an interdisciplinary course of study leading to the Ph.D. in Neuroscience. The Program brings together 64 faculty members from 13 departments in the School of Medicine and College of Arts and Sciences to provide a comprehensive and unified program for graduate study. The overall mission of the neuroscience training program is to train Ph.D. candidates to become outstanding biomedical scientists in order to contribute to a diverse research workforce. The training grant fills a critical niche by supporting trainees in the neurosciences primarily during their second year of training. It is the only training grant at our institution that is dedicated to early-stage neuroscience graduate training. The disciplines and expertise represented range from molecular and cellular to behavioral and clinical. The breadth and depth of our faculty provide a training environment that is both unique and innovative. After building a foundation of shared knowledge and competencies for all trainees, the program embraces a trainee-specific program that is built around an Independent Development Plan (IDP). The IDP allows each trainee to craft and optimize his/her training and career trajectory together with interactive faculty advisory committees. Students are exposed to topics of human health from the earliest stages of the program in systems and disease-based courses. Careful monitoring of each trainee is provided by multiple oversight committees. Moreover, feedback mechanisms between all members of the program afford an efficient means for ongoing improvement of the program. This NIGMS-supported program has been quite successful during its past period of support producing graduates that have embraced all aspects of the modern biomedical workforce. The trainees leave the program prepared for the challenges of the current workforce and have excelled in their individual careers.

Public Health Relevance

The Neuroscience Graduate Program at the University of Virginia is an interdepartmental program that offers an interdisciplinary course of study leading to the Ph.D. in Neuroscience. The Program brings together 64 faculty members from 13 departments in the School of Medicine and College of Arts and Sciences to provide a comprehensive and unified program for graduate study. The overall mission of the neuroscience training program is to train Ph.D. candidates to become outstanding biomedical scientists in order to contribute to a diverse research workforce.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32GM008328-22
Application #
8492095
Study Section
National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group (BRT)
Program Officer
Maas, Stefan
Project Start
1992-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$253,821
Indirect Cost
$12,735
Name
University of Virginia
Department
Neurosciences
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
065391526
City
Charlottesville
State
VA
Country
United States
Zip Code
22904
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