The goal of this program is to develop and prepare skilled, science-based surgeons for productive academic careers focusing on trauma and critical care. To accomplish this goal, we believe that trainees should be placed in basic science oriented laboratories conducting investigations of clinically pertinent questions. The experience provided is designed to educate the trainee in the rigors of the applied scientific method, instill a respect for biological systems and endow them with the curiosity and tools to explore all potential avenues of investigation for problem-solving. We believe that the principles of scientific research and experimental methodology can best be taught in a setting where these are the primary activities of the participants, while providing experiences which can be incorporated into their already established, clinically applicable framework. We also stress that all trainees be exposed to a wide array of techniques and approaches, including, but not limited to animal models, molecular biology, immunology and physiology. This proposal request five years of support for post-doctoral fellows to spend two years in an academic environment to develop physician-scientists interested in trauma / critical care research. We are requesting 2 trainees per year for a total of 4 per year. Candidates for the program are recruited nationally and from various NJMS departments, generally after their second post-graduate year. Trainees work and study with a multidisciplinary group of faculty members, most of whom have been working together for years. The basic training core consists primarily of course work, seminars, lectures, trainee presentations and meetings. The bench research component, a trainee is directly responsible for a primary project that he or she may propose or may be assigned. Trainees also participate in research projects of other trainees and investigators as cooperation in research is emphasized. All projects proceed under the close tutelage of a scientific mentor and with the collaboration of other program faculty members. This training grant takes advantage of a diversified set of projects led by funded and established investigators, all of whom are intimately related to trauma and inflammation research.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of this program is to develop and prepare skilled, science-based surgeons for productive academic careers focusing on trauma and critical care. To accomplish this goal, we believe that trainees should be placed in basic science oriented laboratories conducting investigations of clinically pertinent questions. The experience provided is designed to educate the trainee in the rigors of the applied scientific method, instill a respect for biological systems and endow them with the curiosity and tools to explore all potential avenues of investigation for problem-solving.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
6T32GM069330-08
Application #
8496066
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZGM1-BRT-5 (PD))
Program Officer
Somers, Scott D
Project Start
2004-07-01
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$182,354
Indirect Cost
$13,508
Name
Rutgers University
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
078795851
City
Newark
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
07103
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