The objective of the proposed predoctoral training program is to train the next generation of behavioral science researchers to skillfully incorporate neuroscience perspectives and methods into their programs of research, based on an understanding of brain structure and function that extends across traditional areas of behavioral research. The Behavioral Brain (B2) Research Training Program has the specific aim of providing graduate students committed to research at the interface of the behavioral and brain sciences with foundational training in neuroscience methods and perspectives, through coursework and laboratory-based research experiences. Moreover, trainees receive deep training in behavioral science research, via courses and independent programs of research. Finally, we aim for continued infusion of cross- cutting perspectives, through co-mentoring, laboratory rotation experiences, and program forums that foster exposure to behavioral and brain science research. We believe that basic research focused on the interface between behavior and the brain is crucial for understanding the mechanisms and treatment of a large number of human health issues that cut across NIH Institutes. Because NIGMS has a broad mission, it is the natural home of a training program that aims to bridge behavioral and biomedical approaches across traditionally separate lines of inquiry in the behavioral sciences. By focusing upon the brain as a common substrate, we believe progress in different subfields of behavioral research can be most effectively integrated, thus leveraging advances in one area into other domains of study. This training program focuses on three major research themes to accomplish integration: Representation &Communication;Evaluation &Control;Learning, Memory, &Plasticity. The training program is jointly coordinated by the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. Situated within blocks of one another and possessing excellence in both behavioral research and neuroscience, the institutions share a long history of collegiality and cooperation in graduate training that can be leveraged to broaden and deepen the neuroscience training of the next generation of behavioral science students.

Public Health Relevance

Basic research focused on the interface between behavior and the brain is crucial for understanding the mechanisms and treatment of a large number of human health issues. This training program aims to provide graduate students committed to research at the interface of the behavioral and brain sciences with foundational training in neuroscience research methods and perspectives, through coursework and laboratory-based research experiences.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32GM081760-07
Application #
8500355
Study Section
National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group (BRT)
Program Officer
Singh, Shiva P
Project Start
2007-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$267,927
Indirect Cost
$12,735
Name
University of Pittsburgh
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
004514360
City
Pittsburgh
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
15213
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