This application for continued support of the University of Washington Developmental Biology Training Program will provide support for eleven graduate students for dissertation research in developmental biology. Faculty at the University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center provide an enormous breadth of training opportunities addressing such topics as the origin of cell polarity, germ cell specification and function, body axis formation, stem cell renewal, cell differentiation, cell migration, tissue morphogenesis, metamorphosis, as well as regeneration and death. Trainees are selected from the very competitive graduate programs offered at the University of Washington. They receive in-depth instruction in topics related to developmental biology, responsible conduct of research, and development of skills for a successful career as creative and productive scientists. The program will train future scientists to address topics related to human health, including developmental defects, stem cells, and regenerative medicine. PROJECT NARRATIVE: This application for the Developmental Biology Training Program will provide support for eleven students enrolled in graduate programs at the University of Washington. The program will support dissertation research in modern developmental biology and provide training in the responsible conduct of research. The program will train future scientists to address topics related to human health, including developmental defects, stem cells, and regenerative medicine.

Public Health Relevance

This application for the Developmental Biology Training Program will provide support for eleven students enrolled in graduate programs at the University of Washington. The program will support dissertation research in modern developmental biology and provide training in the responsible conduct of research. The program will train future scientists to address topics related to human health, including developmental defects, stem cells and regenerative medicine.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD007183-32
Application #
8264710
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Mukhopadhyay, Mahua
Project Start
1979-07-01
Project End
2016-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
32
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$417,936
Indirect Cost
$23,524
Name
University of Washington
Department
Anatomy/Cell Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
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