The Population Studies and Training Center of Brown University requests continuing support for its T32 National Research Service Award. We request support for seven doctoral trainees and one postdoctoral trainee. In this application, we provide evidence of a strong multidisciplinary training program, supported by productive, committed faculty drawn from key social science disciplines and allied health fields. The PSTC training program proposed here builds on a dynamic research infrastructure, and we show evidence of major institutional support in the form of new PSTC physical space, significant investments in graduate education generally, and new faculty recruitment. In service of national and international public health needs, the PSTC training program recruits future leaders in the field into graduate study in sociology, economics, and anthropology. Trainees are grounded in their home disciplines and receive significant training in interdisciplinary population studies through coursework, mentored research activity, colloquia, workshops, student-led activities, and education in the responsible conduct of research. An active Training Committee will supervise these training paths, coordinating with our affiliated departments. We describe both continuing and innovative organizational and pedagogical efforts to secure the training goals we outline in this application. Substantive training is organized around key thematic areas that cover conventional demographic topics and expand into newly emerging areas. We demonstrate a high level of professional engagement among students in training and consequent impact on the profession after graduation. Our proposed postdoctoral program builds on a long history of such training (without prior support under this mechanism) and takes advantage of the same superior scholarly environment and interdisciplinary atmosphere. The postdoctoral program is built around individually tailored mentored training and research. We argue that the PSTC T32 training program shows ample evidence of continued intellectual and organizational evolution, dynamic synergy across disciplines and career stage, from new trainee through senior scholar, and a commitment to excellence that will produce and strengthen the next generation of investigators and teachers.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD007338-23
Application #
7845668
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Spittel, Michael
Project Start
1987-09-07
Project End
2013-04-30
Budget Start
2010-05-01
Budget End
2011-04-30
Support Year
23
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$195,534
Indirect Cost
Name
Brown University
Department
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
001785542
City
Providence
State
RI
Country
United States
Zip Code
02912
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