The purpose of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Training Program (DSCB) is to prepare PhD candidates for participation as active scientists in disciplines having an emphasis on developmental biology, stem cell biology and developmental genetics. To accomplish this goal, the training program provides education in core principles of development, genetics, cell biology and molecular biology. Of special importance is the preparation of critical and creative minds. In addition to didactic training, the Program provides and encourages participation in a number of seminars, journal clubs and colloquia that foster discussion, perspective and critical review of the literature. Extensive laboratory training provides each student with a special expertise in his or her chosen specialty. Finally, an interactive environment and collaborations with clinical departments fosters the movement of the discovery process to treatments that will improve the human condition.

Public Health Relevance

An interactive environment and collaborations with clinical departments foster the movement of the discovery process to treatments that will improve the human condition.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
2T32HD040372-11A1
Application #
8268038
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DRG-D (55))
Program Officer
Javois, Lorette Claire
Project Start
2001-05-01
Project End
2017-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
11
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$342,356
Indirect Cost
$17,044
Name
Duke University
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
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Warner, Lisa R; Babbitt, Courtney C; Primus, Alex E et al. (2009) Functional consequences of genetic variation in primates on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in vitro. Brain Res 1288:1-8
Edwards, Thomas A; Wilkinson, Brian D; Wharton, Robin P et al. (2003) Model of the brain tumor-Pumilio translation repressor complex. Genes Dev 17:2508-13