This pre-doctoral training program in Reproductive, Perinatal, and Pediatric Epidemiology centered in the Department of Epidemiology of the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University will train outstanding candidates in the discipline of epidemiology, mentor them in research teams that include basic and clinical scientists, and prepare them as teachers as well as independent researchers. Three students will be recruited each year and supported for up to three years. They will develop methodologic skills from a rigorous core of biostatistics and epidemiologic methods courses and will receive formal training in teaching skills and in the ethical conduct of research. In specialization courses and interdisciplinary seminars, students will gain an academic understanding of the related areas of reproductive, perinatal, and pediatric epidemiology. They will receive mentoring in research methods through research internships to allow them to learn to the skills learned in a formal educational setting to the research setting. Throughout the pre-doctoral curriculum and research experiences, students will progress from more general to specific areas, culminating in dissertation research focused in one of the three fields. Core leaders for these areas are Drs. Carolyn Drews-Botsch (PI and Pediatric Leader), Carol Hogue (Perinatal Leader) and Michele Marcus (Reproductive Leader). All have extensive research and training experience, and two of the three have had experience in administering doctoral programs. Interdisciplinary seminars will expose students to potential mentors. Students'dissertation research will most likely develop from one of these experiences and be funded through ongoing research grants or supplements which the students will obtain. Relevance: More evidence-based and epidemiologic research is required to make major advances in reducing major morbiditiy and mortality associated with gynecologic infertility, unintended pregnancy, pregnancy complications, preterm delivery, developmental disabilities, and congenital defects. Beginning with their dissertation research and continuing throughout their careers, graduates of this program should make significant contributions to this knowledge base.

Public Health Relevance

Narrative Morbidity and mortality associated with human reproduction and child development pose some of the most stubborn public health challenges. The proposed project would train scientists in the most advanced methods of identifying the causes of, prevention methods, and treatments for these conditions. Thus, this project will add to the ability to improve the health of women and children.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD052460-07
Application #
8246999
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Ren, Zhaoxia
Project Start
2006-05-01
Project End
2016-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$314,094
Indirect Cost
$14,970
Name
Emory University
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
066469933
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30322
Chin, Helen B; Howards, Penelope P; Kramer, Michael R et al. (2016) Which female cancer patients fail to receive fertility counseling before treatment in the state of Georgia? Fertil Steril 106:1763-1771.e1
Richards, Jennifer L; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn; Sales, Jessica M et al. (2016) Describing the Shape of the Relationship Between Gestational Age at Birth and Cognitive Development in a Nationally Representative U.S. Birth Cohort. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 30:571-582
Chin, Helen B; Jacobson, Melanie H; Interrante, Julia D et al. (2016) Hypothyroidism after cancer and the ability to meet reproductive goals among a cohort of young adult female cancer survivors. Fertil Steril 105:202-7.e1-2
Garn, Joshua V; Brumback, Babette A; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D et al. (2016) Estimating the Effect of School Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Improvements on Pupil Health Outcomes. Epidemiology 27:752-60
Burke, Rachel M; Suchdev, Parminder S; Rebolledo, Paulina A et al. (2016) Predictors of Inflammation in a Cohort of Bolivian Infants and Toddlers. Am J Trop Med Hyg 95:954-963
Jacobson, Melanie H; Barr, Dana B; Marcus, Michele et al. (2016) Serum polybrominated diphenyl ether concentrations and thyroid function in young children. Environ Res 149:222-30
Souza, J P; Betran, A P; Dumont, A et al. (2016) A global reference for caesarean section rates (C-Model): a multicountry cross-sectional study. BJOG 123:427-36
Knight, Jessica H; Howards, Penelope P; Spencer, Jessica B et al. (2016) Characteristics related to early secondary amenorrhoea and pregnancy among women diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus: an analysis using the GOAL study. Lupus Sci Med 3:e000139
Garn, Joshua V; Mwandawiro, Charles S; Nikolay, Birgit et al. (2016) Ascaris lumbricoides Infection Following School-Based Deworming in Western Kenya: Assessing the Role of Pupils' School and Home Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Exposures. Am J Trop Med Hyg 94:1045-54
Cammack, Alison L; Hogue, Carol J; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D et al. (2016) Test-retest reliability of retrospective self-reported maternal exposure to childhood abuse and neglect. Arch Womens Ment Health 19:415-21

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