(provided by the applicant): The Reproductive, Perinatal, and Pediatric Epidemiology (RPPE) program, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), Gillings School of Global Public Health (SPH), has long emphasized multidisciplinary training. Our program is unique in that it bridges across three departments in the School;Epidemiology, Nutrition, and Maternal and Child Health (MCH). Dr. Siega-Riz is the director and Dr. Julie Daniels will replace Dr. Andrew Olshan as the co-director in the next term. Our goal is to provide trainees with a multidisciplinary perspective: a strong foundation in epidemiologic concepts and methods, the underlying biology of reproduction and child development and growth, and research experience and skills to pursue independent careers in reproductive, perinatal and pediatric epidemiologic research. To achieve this goal, we developed a curriculum based on courses in Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Maternal and Child Health, Nutrition and Biology;seminars on professional development and cutting edge research topics;and research practice guided by our experienced Program Faculty and Affiliated Members. Overall, in our first round of funding we have supported 13 predoctoral students (5 per year);5 who have graduated and entered academics as either research tract faculty or postdoctoral fellows. Average time to completion of the degree has been 4 years. The trainees have published 68 articles during their training with 8 more in the submission process. They have all presented and attended at least one national meeting during their training and have actively participated in our RPPE activities. Two of them have won awards. These accomplishments are an indication that our program goals are being achieved by our trainees and they are highly sought after-successfully gaining employment and highly productive as researchers in the field. Renewal of the RPPE program would permit a stable funding base for training, enhance recruitment of outstanding students, including minority students, and provide a new, innovative structure for training through coursework, research mentorship and venues for discussion and exchange.

Public Health Relevance

The Reproductive, Perinatal, and Pediatric Epidemiology (RPPE) program, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), Gillings School of Global Public Health (SPH), is unique in that it bridges across three departments in the School: Epidemiology, Nutrition, and Maternal and Child Health. Our goal is to provide trainees with a multidisciplinary perspective: a strong foundation in epidemiologic concepts and methods, the underlying biology of reproduction and child development and growth, and research experience and skills to pursue independent careers in reproductive, perinatal and pediatric epidemiologic research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD052468-07
Application #
8634128
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1)
Program Officer
Ren, Zhaoxia
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Public Health & Prev Medicine
Type
Schools of Public Health
DUNS #
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Adgent, Margaret A; Hoffman, Kate; Goldman, Barbara Davis et al. (2014) Brominated flame retardants in breast milk and behavioural and cognitive development at 36 months. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 28:48-57
Strutz, Kelly L; Richardson, Liana J; Hussey, Jon M (2014) Selected preconception health indicators and birth weight disparities in a national study. Womens Health Issues 24:e89-97
Jensen, E T; Daniels, J L; Stürmer, T et al. (2014) Maternal hormonal contraceptive use and offspring overweight or obesity. Int J Obes (Lond) 38:1275-81
Stingone, Jeanette A; Luben, Thomas J; Daniels, Julie L et al. (2014) Maternal exposure to criteria air pollutants and congenital heart defects in offspring: results from the national birth defects prevention study. Environ Health Perspect 122:863-72
Stingone, Jeanette A; Funkhouser, William K; Weissler, Mark C et al. (2013) Racial differences in the relationship between tobacco, alcohol, and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Cancer Causes Control 24:649-64
Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Gray, Gandarvaka L (2013) Gestational weight gain recommendations in the context of the obesity epidemic. Nutr Rev 71 Suppl 1:S26-30
Vladutiu, Catherine J; Poole, Charles; Marshall, Stephen W et al. (2013) Pregnant driver-associated motor vehicle crashes in North Carolina, 2001-2008. Accid Anal Prev 55:165-71
Robinson, W R; Keyes, K M; Utz, R L et al. (2013) Birth cohort effects among US-born adults born in the 1980s: foreshadowing future trends in US obesity prevalence. Int J Obes (Lond) 37:448-54
Vladutiu, Catherine J; Marshall, Stephen W; Poole, Charles et al. (2013) Adverse pregnancy outcomes following motor vehicle crashes. Am J Prev Med 45:629-36
Strutz, Kelly L; Dozier, Ann M; van Wijngaarden, Edwin et al. (2012) Birth outcomes across three rural-urban typologies in the Finger Lakes region of New York. J Rural Health 28:162-73

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