The overall goal of the renewal of this Program is to continue to provide comprehensive and in-depth research training in the reproductive sciences, centrally integrating training in the tools of functional mammalian genomics/genetics and computational biology. To accomplish this goal, a select group of graduate and postdoctoral trainees will have the opportunity to choose and be trained by dual mentors;the primary Trainer having expertise in the reproductive sciences and the Co-Trainer with expertise in genomics and/or computational biology. Eighteen (18) faculty trainers are represented in this application. We are requesting support for two (2) baccalaureate PhD slots and three (3) postdoctoral slots (one of which is reserved for a MD/DVM-Seeking-PhD trainee), each for a two-year training interval. Support is requested for a total of five (5) years for this training program. The philosophy behind this proposed training plan is based upon the appreciation that biomedical researchers in the reproductive sciences would benefit greatly from parallel training in practical and applied use of genome-wide investigative techniques. Cornell University is uniquely poised for a training program in reproductive sciences that spans male and female physiology, the genetic bases of fertility, physiology of the maternal-fetal interface, cell signaling and molecula endocrinology and the molecular and genetic basis for reproductive cancers. In addition, the proposed program will benefit greatly by inclusion of faculty members with interests in non-mammalian models of reproduction in Drosophila and C. elegans to facilitate comparative evolutionary studies. Training in the genomics and computational areas will emphasize the following (some examples): creation and use of transgenic and knockout models (animal models for the study of fertility as well as models of disease pathophysiology emphasizing reproductive neoplasia);use of micro arrays and bioinformatics analyses including comprehensive training in manipulation of databases for model organisms and genomic browsers/portals that serve to aid in determination of genotype/phenotype relationships;creation of computer-based modeling to facilitate informed decisions on structure/function relationships;analysis of gene transcription networks based upon application of principles of comparative genomics. The faculty involved in this proposed Program is committed to facilitating a training environment in the reproductive sciences and its interface with genome structure and activity. The collaborative effort(s) between Trainers and coTrainers is the cornerstone of this program. This unique scientific and technical interface will enhance the opportunity for pre- and postdoctoral trainees to leave this environment well-trained in the reproductive sciences and in multiple state-of-the-art techniques and applications in genomics that will optimize their continued success in continued training (transitioning to postdoctoral) or the acquisition of scientific positions in academia, government or industry.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of this training Program is to continue to provide comprehensive and in-depth research training in the reproductive sciences, centrally integrating training in the tools of functional mammalian genomics/genetics and computational biology in order to address problems of world population, long-term sustainability and infertility. To this end, graduate and postdoctoral trainees will choose and be trained by dual mentors;the primary Trainer having expertise in the reproductive sciences and the Co-Trainer with expertise in genomics and/or computational biology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD052471-08
Application #
8681485
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DRG-D (55))
Program Officer
Taymans, Susan
Project Start
2006-04-01
Project End
2017-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$170,174
Indirect Cost
$14,946
Name
Cornell University
Department
Other Basic Sciences
Type
Schools of Veterinary Medicine
DUNS #
872612445
City
Ithaca
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
14850
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