This is a unique and highly valuable interdisciplinary training program from two strong institutions (Cornell University and Weill Cornell Medical College) with a superbly skilled set of productive faculty, focused on complex and scientifically significant public health issues. The program links basic principles of learning and development with clinical questions to train individuals in a new emerging discipline of translational developmental neuroscience. Students will begin their fundamental training on the Ithaca campus and continue at Weill Cornell with joint courses, summer rotations, mentorship, two annual meetings and video teleconferenced seminars to integrate their graduate experience throughout the training. Training will be open to graduate students as well as medical students, undergraduates, residents and post doctoral fellows and will include a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including pharmacology, neuroanatomy, electrophysiology, imaging, genomic and transgenic approaches within animal models and specific clinical populations. Theses will be mentored jointly by faculty members at each campus and targeted by the student at the end of the second year. These trainees will emerge with exceptional training in both how to choose and design research questions and how to apply this skill in clinical settings with the most current and powerful techniques, thus concentrating their training directly on translational research. Neurodevelopmental disorders targeted include autism, affective and mood disorders, ADHD, dyslexia and learning impairments caused by environmental and genetic factors. Students trained in this program will use the most current imaging and genomic techniques. They will thus possess the training and tools of the best of basic and clinical research together.

Public Health Relevance

The program links basic principles of learning and development with clinical questions to train individuals in a new emerging discipline of translational developmental neuroscience. This training in designing research questions and applying this skill in clinical settings to neurodevelopmental disorders and with the most current and powerful techniques will produce a new generation of translational researchers.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD055177-04
Application #
8263056
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Freund, Lisa S
Project Start
2009-05-05
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$166,986
Indirect Cost
$8,554
Name
Cornell University
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
872612445
City
Ithaca
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
14850
Charvet, Christine J; Reep, Roger L; Finlay, Barbara L (2016) Evolution of cytoarchitectural landscapes in the mammalian isocortex: Sirenians (Trichechus manatus) in comparison with other mammals. J Comp Neurol 524:772-82
Golden, James R; Vilankar, Kedarnath P; Wu, Michael C K et al. (2016) Conjectures regarding the nonlinear geometry of visual neurons. Vision Res 120:74-92
Baran, Nicole M; Sklar, Nathan C; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth (2016) Developmental effects of vasotocin and nonapeptide receptors on early social attachment and affiliative behavior in the zebra finch. Horm Behav 78:20-31
Pattwell, Siobhan S; Liston, Conor; Jing, Deqiang et al. (2016) Dynamic changes in neural circuitry during adolescence are associated with persistent attenuation of fear memories. Nat Commun 7:11475
King, Elizabeth C; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Glatt, Charles E et al. (2014) Sensitive periods in fear learning and memory. Stress 17:13-21
Dincheva, Iva; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Tessarollo, Lino et al. (2014) BDNF modulates contextual fear learning during adolescence. Dev Neurosci 36:269-76
Malter Cohen, Matthew; Jing, Deqiang; Yang, Rui R et al. (2013) Early-life stress has persistent effects on amygdala function and development in mice and humans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:18274-8
Pattwell, Siobhan S; Casey, B J; Lee, Francis S (2013) ""Altered Fear in Mice and Humans"". Curr Dir Psychol Sci 22:146-151
King, Elizabeth C; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Sun, Alice et al. (2013) Nonlinear developmental trajectory of fear learning and memory. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1304:62-9
Pattwell, Siobhan S; Lee, Francis S; Casey, B J (2013) Fear learning and memory across adolescent development: Hormones and Behavior Special Issue: Puberty and Adolescence. Horm Behav 64:380-9

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