The University of Southern California (USC) Training Program in Developmental Biology, Stem Cells, and Regeneration (DSCR) provides graduate students with unified training in mechanistic studies of fundamental developmental processes combined with training in the biology and application of stem cell technology. A distinguishing theme of this program is the incorporation of clinical and translational science into the curriculum of students in the DSCR track, based on the premise that strong basic science graduate training can and should be coupled with an appropriately structured exposure to clinical and translational science in a way that will better train the next generation of scientists to be able to realize the clinical and therapeutic potential of developmental biology discoveries. The faculty of this program includes a balanced mix of full, associate, and assistant professors from several USC schools and campuses. These faculty members have proven records of graduate student training, a long history of collaborative research, and approximately half hold clinical degrees and are active clinical translational scientists. The DSCR Program draws students primarily from a highly successful USC interdepartmental graduate student recruitment and first year of studies program (PIBBS;Programs in Biological and Biomedical Sciences);this outstanding cohort of students comes from diverse backgrounds, and includes a prominent representation of training-grant-eligible underrepresented minority students. Predoctoral students are supported by the PIBBS program in their first year of graduate studies, during which they take core classes and do research laboratory rotations. Three new students per year enter the training program at the beginning of their second year, and are supported for two years. Specialized courses and additional program functions provide a rigorous and diverse training experience for students to realize the full potential of the convergent fields of developmental biology, stem cell biology, and regenerative medicine. PROJECT NARRATIVE: Many of the most intractable diseases of our day result from a failure of the body to regenerate damaged tissue. Studies of basic developmental biological mechanisms, combined with an understanding of stem cell biology and differentiation, may lead to novel approaches to treat these diseases.

Public Health Relevance

Many of the most intractable diseases of our day result from a failure of the body to regenerate damaged tissue. Studies of basic developmental biological mechanisms, combined with an understanding of stem cell biology and differentiation, may lead to novel approaches to treat these diseases.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HD060549-03
Application #
8469066
Study Section
Pediatrics Subcommittee (CHHD)
Program Officer
Javois, Lorette Claire
Project Start
2011-05-01
Project End
2016-04-30
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$163,943
Indirect Cost
$8,554
Name
University of Southern California
Department
Pathology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
072933393
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90089
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Neben, Cynthia L; Idoni, Brian; Salva, Joanna E et al. (2014) Bent bone dysplasia syndrome reveals nucleolar activity for FGFR2 in ribosomal DNA transcription. Hum Mol Genet 23:5659-71