This grant will continue funding for a successful, 35-year training program in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. The purpose of the program is to train behavioral and medical scientists to conduct interdisciplinary and translational research aimed at the prevention of CVD in communities. The training will be derived principally from direct research experience in an existing, excellent interdisciplinary research resource, the Stanford Prevention Research Center (SPRC), which includes community, policy, behavioral, and clinical research that totals $9 million annually. Current research includes studies examining a range of topics that include overweight/obesity and weight loss interventions (e.g., ethnic dance and screen time reduction in Latina girls;home-based nutrition intervention and play group exercise for low income Latinas;comparing case management environmental support in an under-served population;targeting overweight/obese adults with insomnia or asthma;comparing weight stabilization strategies) the built environment (e.g.,. neighborhood impact on physical activity in older adults;the effects of tobacco outlet density on teen smoking) as well as comparative treatments for smoking cessation, and improving physical activity assessment methodology through the use of new technologies. In addition, the SPRC is one of the clinical sites for the ongoing follow-up of the Women's Health Initiative. Working closely with 1-2 faculty, trainees develop an individual research project, join an ongoing research program for tailored training experiences, conduct data analyses, and publish 2-3 papers per year. Directed study, a weekly research seminar, regular career development seminars, participation in grant preparation, selected course attendance, and limited patient care and teaching round out the training. Physician trainees will enter a specific track that includes an optional 1-year MS degree in epidemiology or in clinical investigation. Trainee selection is based on interest in cardiovascular disease prevention, potential for an academic research career, and demonstrated excellence. We request eight postdoctoral positions for trainees who have either the M.D. or Ph.D. degree, or both. Of the 30 postdoctoral fellows completing training in the past 10 years (2001- 2010) 26 (87%) are currently in academic or other research positions;of the 39 postdoctoral trainees appointed in the past 10 years, 26 were women (67%) and 8 were under-represented minorities (21%;2 Hispanic, 5 African-American, 1 Native American). Six of the eight are in academic positions, and two are still in training here.

Public Health Relevance

This grant will continue funding for a successful, 35-year training program in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. The purpose of the program is to train behavioral and medical scientists to conduct interdisciplinary and translational research aimed at the prevention of CVD in communities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HL007034-39
Application #
8700451
Study Section
NHLBI Institutional Training Mechanism Review Committee (NITM)
Program Officer
Silsbee, Lorraine M
Project Start
1985-07-01
Project End
2016-07-31
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
39
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Stanford University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Stanford
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94304
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