This renewal training program will continue to train next generation of scientists in the areas of statistical genetic analysis, genetic epidemiology, and bioinformatics, with emphasis placed on advancing research in the area of cardiopulmonary and cardiovascular disease. Specifically, the first goal is to lay a solid foundation for the trainees in understanding epidemiology/genetic epidemiology, biostatistics and bioinformatics. We have designed a unique course curriculum for the trainees that maintains a focus on statistical genetics/bioinformatics while allowing flexibility in the remainder of their PhD training. The second goal is to provide training in implementing and developing methods of analysis, with a particular focus on their application to cardiopulmonary diseases. We will accomplish these goals using a co-mentoring system, with the primary mentor focused on developing and extending analysis methods and the co-mentor(s) providing domain expertise for the cardiopulmonary application of those methods. Multiple didactic and practical exposures, formal and informal mentoring, communication with internationally known biostatisticians/geneticists/cardiopulmonary epidemiologists, and training in the responsible conduct of research, will all be incorporated into the training program. Particularly, significant changes have been made in this renewal application. 1) New leadership has been established. 2) Only predoctoral students will be trained, to focus on our modernized predoctoral program that has produced many highly successful academics. 3) We expand training in bioinformatics, since Big Data is gaining importance in genomic and translational research. 4) A significant number of new training faculty who are well funded, have diverse areas of expertise, and have abundant training experience in both methodological and content areas have been recruited. 5) Strict evaluation and career mentoring plans will be applied to further improve the training quality. 6) Junior mentors will bring new cutting-edge research, with a junior mentor training plan in place. 7) A new recruitment plan of URM has been developed. We thus believe the BGACD program will continue its success in training biomedical scientists, in particular to help understand the etiology of cardiopulmonary disease.

Public Health Relevance

The training program in Biometric Genetic Analysis of Cardiopulmonary Disease (BGACD) has the primary goal of training the next generation of scientists in the areas of statistical genetic analysis, genetic epidemiology, and bioinformatics, with emphasis placed on advancing research in the area of cardiopulmonary and cardiovascular disease. The program will particularly focus on the development of statistical genetic methods and bioinformatics with their application in cardiopulmonary and cardiovascular disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HL007567-33
Application #
9415395
Study Section
NHLBI Institutional Training Mechanism Review Committee (NITM)
Program Officer
Silsbee, Lorraine M
Project Start
1994-07-01
Project End
2022-01-31
Budget Start
2018-02-01
Budget End
2019-01-31
Support Year
33
Fiscal Year
2018
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Case Western Reserve University
Department
Genetics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
077758407
City
Cleveland
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
44106
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