The Department of Physiology &Biomedical Engineering (BME) at Mayo Clinic has a long and rich history of preparing pre- and postdoctoral students for academic careers in a biomedical research environment that is increasingly more technological and complex. We strongly believe that a training grant that takes the novel approach of encouraging and nurturing biomedical research skills alongside computational, mathematical and engineering skills will create a unique cadre of future leaders in biomedical research related to lung disease. diverse backgrounds, we plan to recruit: 1) Predoctoral students via the Mayo Graduate (PhD students) and Medical (MD/PhD students) Schools;2) Postdoctoral PhD scientists from applicants working in or applying to faculty laboratories;and 3) Postdoctoral MD or MD/PhD clinician-scientists from the large pool of residents or fellows from participating clinical departments (especially Anesthesiology, Pulmonary/Critical Care, Radiology 15 NIH-funded key faculty mentors and 3 postdoctoral trainees (with PhD and/or MD). From a pool of highly competitive eligible candidates with and Surgery). A total of were selected based on their outstanding pre- and trainees 4 addition, in funding. extramural via Under the auspices of the Training Program in Lung Physiology and Biomedical Engineering we propose a multifaceted program to train the next generation of biomedical researchers in lung physiology and disease. The primary objectives of the training program will be to train three groups of trainees for biomedical research careers in lung physiology and disease: 1) Predoctoral PhD (or MD/PhD) students with undergraduate backgrounds in engineering, mathematics or physics;2) Postdoctoral PhD scientists with backgrounds in engineering, mathematics, physics or basic biomedical sciences;and 3) Postdoctoral MD or MD/PhD clinician- scientists. To achieve our objectives, we are requesting support for 3 predoctoral students (PhD or MD/PhD) postdoctoral training records and their abilities to support associate faculty members were selected based on their considerable promise for successful independent academic careers and their dedication to mentoring the next generation of biomedical scientists in lung Physiology &BME) who has extensive experience in biomedical research and demonstrated leadership in physiology and disease. The program will be led by Dr. Gary Sieck (Professor and Chair of the Department of graduate and postgraduate education as well as administration at the departmental, institutional and national. In addition to a common formal didactic program in lung physiology and BME, individual trainee needs will be met by elective coursework. Trainees will also receive training in writing manuscripts and grant applications. Furthermore, they will be encouraged to network and become involved in the scientific community through presentations at regional, national and international meetings. Success of the training program will be determined by retention and placement of trainees in academia at all levels of career development and ultimately as established, extramurally-funded biomedical researchers.

Public Health Relevance

Respiratory and lung diseases such as asthma, bronchitis, COPD, pulmonary fibrosis, and pulmonary hypertension impose an enormous healthcare and financial burden on the US population as well as worldwide. There is substantial societal need to train the next generation of lung researchers to take the lead in addressing these important healthcare issues. In this regard, the collaboration between scientists and engineers is key. We strongly believe that a training grant that takes the novel approach of encouraging and nurturing biomedical research skills alongside computational, mathematical and engineering skills in carefully selected trainees will create a unique cadre of future leaders in biomedical research. Under the auspices of the Training Program in Lung Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, we propose to use a multifaceted approach to train this next generation of researchers using a cadre of outstanding basic research and clinical faculty mentors with diverse backgrounds, and a world-class research and educational environment within the Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering at the Mayo Clinic.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HL105355-02
Application #
8434859
Study Section
NHLBI Institutional Training Mechanism Review Committee (NITM)
Program Officer
Tigno, Xenia
Project Start
2012-03-01
Project End
2017-02-28
Budget Start
2013-03-01
Budget End
2014-02-28
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$303,669
Indirect Cost
$19,227
Name
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Department
Type
DUNS #
006471700
City
Rochester
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55905
Britt Jr, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R et al. (2015) Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells. J Cell Physiol 230:1189-98
Mantilla, Carlos B; Stowe, Jessica M; Sieck, Dylan C et al. (2014) TrkB kinase activity maintains synaptic function and structural integrity at adult neuromuscular junctions. J Appl Physiol (1985) 117:910-20
Mantilla, Carlos B; Greising, Sarah M; Stowe, Jessica M et al. (2014) TrkB kinase activity is critical for recovery of respiratory function after cervical spinal cord hemisection. Exp Neurol 261:190-5
Gransee, Heather M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C et al. (2013) Targeted delivery of TrkB receptor to phrenic motoneurons enhances functional recovery of rhythmic phrenic activity after cervical spinal hemisection. PLoS One 8:e64755
Mantilla, Carlos B; Greising, Sarah M; Zhan, Wen-Zhi et al. (2013) Prolonged C2 spinal hemisection-induced inactivity reduces diaphragm muscle specific force with modest, selective atrophy of type IIx and/or IIb fibers. J Appl Physiol (1985) 114:380-6
Greising, Sarah M; Sieck, Dylan C; Sieck, Gary C et al. (2013) Novel method for transdiaphragmatic pressure measurements in mice. Respir Physiol Neurobiol 188:56-9
Greising, Sarah M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Gorman, Britney A et al. (2013) Diaphragm muscle sarcopenia in aging mice. Exp Gerontol 48:881-7