This is an application for renewal of grant T32-MH015174, formerly titled: Neurobehavioral Sciences Research Training Program, which has been funded continuously since 1978. To reflect our increased emphasis on translational neuroscience we have decided to rename the T32: Translational Neuroscience Training Program. This is evidenced by our new faculty list consisting of a balanced mix of basic neuroscientists with an interest in brain disorders and translational neuroscientists working directly on models of neurological or psychiatric disorders. Reni Hen (10% effort), the director of this program, will chair a three-person steering committee that also includes Holly Moore (10% effort) and Tom Jessell (5% effort). The primary goal of this proposal is to train postdoctoral fellows (PhDs and MD/PhDs) for careers as independent researchers at the interface between neuroscience and psychiatry as well as neurology. An intensive program is outlined in which fellows will be exposed to a series of courses, workshops and lectures by a mix of basic and preclinical neuroscientists as well as psychiatrists and neurologists. In the course of training, fellows will also acquire a range of skills relevant to research methodology, ethics and career development. Graduating fellows will be able to present clearly an entire project in both written and oral form as evidenced by publications, presentations and grant writing. A trainee must maintain the highest standards of scientific integrity and understand the ethical issues relevant to animal and human experimentation. The success of the training program is reflected in both the accomplishments of the trainees and in the diversity of the fellows. In the past 10 years, 31 fellows have been selected to enter the training program;48% female, 12% minorities. The rate of recruitment of minorities over the last 5 years has increased to 17% of fellows. Of the 31 postdoctoral fellows supported during the past 10 years, 29 are either in training or employed full time in scientific research, teaching or administration in neuroscience. Seven are faculty members, three are independent full-time researchers at research institutes, six are either research scientists or research fellows at universities. Six graduates have already received RO1s, and several others have applications pending. In total, 20 graduates have received substantial independent funding including R01s, K awards, R03 awards, NARSAD awards and other funding agencies. The greatest strength of this training program has always been the exceptionally large basic neuroscience and translational neuroscience communities present at Columbia University as well as the research environment within the Departments of Neuroscience, Psychiatry and beyond. Our increased emphasis on translational neuroscience will hopefully create a generation of researchers who are equally comfortable with basic science and clinical questions and who will provide us in the future with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Public Health Relevance

The primary goal of this proposal is to train postdoctoral fellows for careers as independent researchers at the interface between neuroscience and psychiatry as well as neurology. Our emphasis on translational neuroscience will hopefully create a generation of researchers who are equally comfortable with basic science and clinical questions and who will provide us in the future with a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying neurological and psychiatric disorders. )

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32MH015174-36
Application #
8262369
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-S (01))
Program Officer
Desmond, Nancy L
Project Start
1977-07-01
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
36
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$217,045
Indirect Cost
$15,796
Name
Columbia University (N.Y.)
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
621889815
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10032
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