Development is critical for understanding psychopathology, particularly for understanding the precursors and early manifestations of illness. This postdoctoral training program, now in its 32nd year, focuses on training scientists in areas related to translational developmental neuroscience. The Developmental Psychobiology Research Group (DPRG) is a multi-specialty, multi-departmental, multi-institutional group of collaborative scientists from throughout the Denver metropolitan region. The DPRG has administered this T32 training program since its inception over 30 years ago and is requesting an additional five years of funding with eight trainees per year for its 2-3 year postdoctoral training program. Half of the spots are reserved for physicians (primarily child psychiatrists) who will generally enter the program with five to seven years of postdoctoral experience;the remaining spots will be utilized by individuals with a PhD, who will generally enter the program with zero to four years of postdoctoral training. Mentoring faculty are chosen based on research accomplishment and a history of successful research mentoring;92% of the faculty are senior faculty (Associate or full Professors). The program includes both core and individualized curricular components. Core curricular components includes an ongoing work-in-progress seminar with both faculty and trainee involvement, a writing seminar, yearly retreats, career development retreats, and a seminar related to the Responsible Conduct of Research. The individualized curricular components include both class work and direct project experience, including dissemination, mentored by a mentorship team. A comprehensive review of the program demonstrated the high level of success of this program's graduates as well as ways for the program to improve and provide even better training. Evaluation of the program is ongoing. Strengths of the program include the quality of the applicants, a collaborative group of outstanding faculty, interaction of trainees from a variety of disciplines, and a strong evaluation process. The scientists trained by this program become leaders in identifying the child and adolescent precursors to mental illness, and in developing novel strategies for treatment and prevention.

Public Health Relevance

Development is critical for understanding psychopathology, particularly for understanding the precursors and early manifestations of illness. This postdoctoral training program, now in its 32nd year, focuses on training scientists in areas related to translational developmental neuroscience. The scientists trained by this program become leaders in identifying the child and adolescent precursors to mental illness, and in developing novel strategies for treatment and prevention.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32MH015442-35
Application #
8266325
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-I (01))
Program Officer
Sarampote, Christopher S
Project Start
1978-07-01
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
35
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$328,942
Indirect Cost
$25,324
Name
University of Colorado Denver
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
041096314
City
Aurora
State
CO
Country
United States
Zip Code
80045
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