The objective of this training program (the Biomedical Neuroscience Training Program) is to develop and train basic and clinical scientists to understand the biology of the brain and mind and to be well versed in current therapies for psychiatric illness. The trainees are presented with a program that allows them to do research in a number of laboratories studying anything from the molecular and cellular biology of neurons to imaging of the brain in psychiatric patients. This comprehensive program allows trainees to develop novel experimental approaches to both discovery and therapy. The Biomedical Neuroscience Training Program also instills skills necessary to help clinical trainees more effectively research the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of psychiatric disease. Our challenge is to integrate molecular and cellular neurobiology with higher order systems so that the confluence between brain and mind can be better understood. Trainers have been carefully selected to provide an environment where basic and clinical trainees will enrich each other's experience and learn to work together in the spirit of truly translational research. These trainers are housed in several departments within the College of Medicine (as well as a few in the College of Arts and Sciences) at UlC, but are committed to the training program as a single entity. Candidates will be a mix of graduate students (both PhD and MD/PhD) and postdoctoral fellows (both psychiatry residents and clinical psychology fellows). Thus, in addition to pure research training, a specific goal of the program is to train psychiatrists/psychologists to engage in research and to excite basic scientists about the possibility of a career in translational neuroscience research. Furthermore, those doing basic neurobiology will be attuned to the implications of their research for mental health. The program also supports a series of colloquia expected to deliver current data and speculation about both basic and clinical neuroscience. Finally, it is emphasized that a strength of this program is its ability to recruit and train underrepresented minorities and to bring them into the ranks of researchers in neurobiology, psychiatry and clinical psychology.

Public Health Relevance

This is a request to fund a training program combining basic neuroscientists and clinician scientists. The interactive environment allows these two groups to develop a mutual appreciation and generates neuroscientists with an understanding of psychiatry and psychiatric scientists with a good foundation in neurobiology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32MH067631-08
Application #
8287714
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-C (01))
Program Officer
Chavez, Mark
Project Start
2003-04-01
Project End
2015-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$206,849
Indirect Cost
$15,602
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Physiology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
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