We request a continuation of the T35 Training Program at the State University of New York College of Optometry that has existed for over 30 years. The purpose of the program is to introduce optometry students to basic, translational, and clinical optometric and vision science research by participating full-time for ten weeks in a research project mentored by one of the fifteen members of our distinguished research faculty. Research programs of the training faculty include cell biology, ocular pharmacology, visual psychophysics, computational modeling, visual neuroscience, optics, and clinical vision science. In addition to research, trainees will attend research colloquia, graduate seminars, journal clubs, and a course in Scientific Ethics and the Responsible Conduct of Research. It is expected that this experience will provide trainees with both technical and problem solving skills that will inspire them to include vision research as one important component of their future career as optometrists. In the most favorable scenario, highly motivated trainees will choose to continue their research by entering the combined O.D.-M.S. or O.D.-Ph.D. graduate programs in Vision Science and thereby obtain both a clinical and a research degree. The training will be conducted within the 50,000 sq. ft. of state-of-the-art basic, translational, and clinical research space at the College. The College also maintains computer, electronic, graphic, and extensive library facilities that are freely available to the trainees. Trainees will consist of optometry students from any of the Colleges of Optometry in the US who have completed their first or second year of the professional program and have shown high academic achievement. The Training Program strives to provide trainees the clinician/researcher interface that is essential t bringing the latest scientific discoveries to the clinic. This experience is aimed at providing students, and later to be doctors, the knowledge and skillset to both continue in research and to provide the latest and most optimal vision treatment and care to the patient.

Public Health Relevance

The purpose of the program is to introduce optometry students to basic, translational, and clinical optometric and vision science research by participating full-time for ten weeks in a summer research project. This experience is aimed at providing the next generation of optometrists the knowledge and skillset to provide the latest and most optimal vision treatment and care to their patients.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Eye Institute (NEI)
Type
NRSA Short -Term Research Training (T35)
Project #
5T35EY020481-10
Application #
9620063
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZEY1)
Program Officer
Agarwal, Neeraj
Project Start
2010-01-08
Project End
2019-12-31
Budget Start
2019-01-01
Budget End
2019-12-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
State College of Optometry
Department
Biology
Type
Schools of Optometry/Opht Tech
DUNS #
152652764
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10036
Harrison, Wendy W; Putnam, Nicole M; Shukis, Christine et al. (2017) The corneal nerve density in the sub-basal plexus decreases with increasing myopia: a pilot study. Ophthalmic Physiol Opt 37:482-488
Joshi, Nabin R; Ly, Emma; Viswanathan, Suresh (2017) Intensity response function of the photopic negative response (PhNR): effect of age and test-retest reliability. Doc Ophthalmol 135:1-16
Chao, Cecilia; Richdale, Kathryn; Jalbert, Isabelle et al. (2017) Non-invasive objective and contemporary methods for measuring ocular surface inflammation in soft contact lens wearers - A review. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 40:273-282
Caziot, Baptiste; Backus, Benjamin T; Lin, Esther (2017) Early dynamics of stereoscopic surface slant perception. J Vis 17:4
Gong, Celia R; Troilo, David; Richdale, Kathryn (2017) Accommodation and Phoria in Children Wearing Multifocal Contact Lenses. Optom Vis Sci 94:353-360
Willeford, Kevin T; Fimreite, Vanessa; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J (2016) The effect of spectral filters on VEP and alpha-wave responses. J Optom 9:110-7
Dul, Mitchell; Ennis, Robert; Radner, Shira et al. (2015) Retinal adaptation abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 56:1329-34
Zhao, Linxi; Sendek, Caroline; Davoodnia, Vandad et al. (2015) Effect of Age and Glaucoma on the Detection of Darks and Lights. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 56:7000-6
Bartov, Jenny; Giesel, Martin; Zaidi, Qasim (2015) Exploring the veridicality of shape-from-shading for real 3D objects. J Vis 15:964
Fimreite, Vanessa; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Yadav, Naveen K (2015) Effect of luminance on the visually-evoked potential in visually-normal individuals and in mTBI/concussion. Brain Inj :1-12

Showing the most recent 10 out of 15 publications