Establishing the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) will fundamentally alter the nature of clinical and translational investigation at UIC and our partners (Advocate Health Care, Jesse Brown VA Medical Center, Ul Peoria, Ul Rockford, Ul Urbana). Harnessing our diversity of background, interests and expertise, the UIC CCTS will effectively catalyze collaborative thinking and innovation. The CCTS will organize, finance, and house the infrastructure, expertise, and resources of value to clinical translational investigators within a single academic home, with leadership that reports to the highest levels of UIC administration. This reorganization crosses administrative boundaries to harness and enhance existing UIC resources. A major element of UlC's vision for its future its operationalized by establishing the UIC CCTS, which will have the following Specific Aims.
Specific Aim # 1: Create and develop an academic home for clinical translational research at UIC. This home will provide a flexible and adaptable infrastructure to stimulate collaborative thinking, generative discourse, and collective action to facilitate clinical and translational investigation. The creation of this home will include establishing a robust Pilot Grant Program, a Clinical and Translational Science Academy, a web-based and geographic single-point-of-access for investigators to make use of CCTS expertise and resources, and a CCTS Matchmaking service to identify and catalyze novel collaborations.
Specific Aim # 2 contributes to the academic home by establishing the research service infrastructure (the 6 Research Service Cores) to provide clinical research support services required by clinical and translational investigators.
Specific Aim # 3 contributes to creation of the academic home by providing multifaceted educational experiences for pre-and post-doctoral trainees, junior faculty, and established faculty wishing to extend their thinking beyond their current disciplinary boundaries. Establishing the UIC CCTS will optimize collaboration with our key clinical research partners, and allow us to facilitate new and innovative investigation in pediatrics and community-based science. The administrative reorganization represented by the UIC CCTS will lead to rationalization and integration of significant and mature UIC resources for clinical translational research. It will add to these resources to produce something better for clinical translational researchers and trainees at UIC and at key partner institutions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Type
Linked Training Award (TL1)
Project #
3TL1TR000155-05S1
Application #
8664963
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-SRC (99))
Program Officer
Purucker, Mary E
Project Start
2008-05-19
Project End
2013-10-31
Budget Start
2013-06-06
Budget End
2013-10-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$39,989
Indirect Cost
$2,913
Name
University of Colorado Denver
Department
Pediatrics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
041096314
City
Aurora
State
CO
Country
United States
Zip Code
80045
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