This study establishes a new item bank for self-efficacy for the PROMIS project. Self-efficacy is defined as an individual's perception of their ability to successfully perform certain tasks or behaviors, or more specifically, as the belief that one can carry out a behavior to achieve a desired goal related to one's health. Our study will focus upon self-efficacy for self-management of chronic medical conditions. The significance of self-efficacy is based on two main features: 1) self-efficacy is a pivotal mediator of human behavior and 2) self-efficacy has been shown to be modifiable by interventions that foster self-management skills. Successful adjustment and good outcomes in chronic disorders depend upon the ability to adopt and master new behaviors. A multi-step process will be employed to develop the item pool, with contributions from experts in the field of self-efficacy, clinicians, and patients. Validation studies of the self-efficacy item pool will be conducted in five chronic neurologic disorders: epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, peripheral neuropathy, and stroke. We will investigate the effects of diverse clinical features of these disorders on self-efficacy. Based on patient-reported data, we will also assess the magnitude of a clinically important difference and the responsiveness to change of the new self-efficacy measures. Relevance Developing the PROMIS self-efficacy item bank will raise awareness and promote clinical research in self-efficacy in many chronic disorders, thereby pushing this important field forward. The ultimate goal of these studies is to provide information that will aid in the development of interventions to improve self-efficacy, promote self-management and reduce and delay disability.

Public Health Relevance

Developing the PROMIS self-efficacy item bank will raise awareness and promote clinical research in self-efficacy in many chronic disorders, thereby pushing this important field forward. The ultimate goal of these studies is to provide information that will aid in the development of interventions to improve self-efficacy, promote self-management and reduce and delay disability.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
5U01AR057967-03
Application #
8129648
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-RPHB-A (54))
Program Officer
Serrate-Sztein, Susana
Project Start
2009-09-30
Project End
2013-07-31
Budget Start
2011-08-01
Budget End
2012-07-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$623,839
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Neurology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
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Moinpour, Carol M; Donaldson, Gary W; Davis, Kimberly M et al. (2017) The challenge of measuring intra-individual change in fatigue during cancer treatment. Qual Life Res 26:259-271
Zhao, Yue (2017) Impact of IRT item misfit on score estimates and severity classifications: an examination of PROMIS depression and pain interference item banks. Qual Life Res 26:555-564
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Stephens, Helen E; Joyce, Nanette C; Oskarsson, Björn (2017) National Study of Muscle Cramps in ALS in the USA. Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener 18:32-36
Lee, Augustine C; Driban, Jeffrey B; Price, Lori Lyn et al. (2017) Responsiveness and Minimally Important Differences for 4 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Short Forms: Physical Function, Pain Interference, Depression, and Anxiety in Knee Osteoarthritis. J Pain 18:1096-1110
Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Velozo, Craig; Romero, Sergio et al. (2017) Validation of the PROMIS® measures of self-efficacy for managing chronic conditions. Qual Life Res 26:1915-1924
Howell, Carrie R; Thompson, Lindsay A; Gross, Heather E et al. (2017) Association of consistently suboptimal quality of life with consistently poor asthma control in children with asthma. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 119:562-564.e1
Cella, David; Lai, Jin-Shei; Jensen, Sally E et al. (2016) PROMIS Fatigue Item Bank had Clinical Validity across Diverse Chronic Conditions. J Clin Epidemiol 73:128-34

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