Between 2002-2006, the prospective Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study enrolled 3939 adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to address overarching goals of identifying predictors of rapid progression of kidney disease and clarifying the relationship between kidney dysfunction and the risks of subclinical and clinical cardiovascular events, death, and resource utilization. The proposed Phase III of CRIC, which extends follow-up through 2018, offers a unique opportunity to leverage the existing effort and success of CRIC to establish a cohort of participants with CKD who have long-term prospective follow-up on progression of kidney disease and a variety of different outcomes. This unparalleled resource will also expand the science related to CKD natural history as well as the impact on cardiovascular disease and other adverse events. This application is submitted in response to RFA-DK-12-508, "Limited Competition: Continuation of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study (U01)," on behalf of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Clinical Center. During the first two phases of the CRIC Study, the UIC Clinical Center research team has been successful in terms of recruitment, retention, protocol implementation, data quality, and scientific productivity. Noteworthy achievements at UIC have included a strong focus on heath disparities in CKD, a significant number of UIC investigator-led publications, and the promotion of new physician-scientists. In addition, the UIC investigators have successfully leveraged the CRIC infrastructure to secure a number of funded ancillary studies including the Hispanic CRIC Study (R01DK072231, Lash), Sleep as a Novel Risk Factor in CKD (R01DK071696, Van Cauter), a Midcareer Investigator Award in Patient-Oriented Research (K24, DK092290, Lash), a K23 Career Development Award (K23DK091313, Lora), a Diversity Supplement (Ricardo), and a Fogarty International Research Collaboration Award (R03TW009441, Lash).

Public Health Relevance

The prospective Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study enrolled 3939 adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to address overarching goals of identifying predictors of rapid progression of kidney disease and clarifying the relationship between kidney disease and the risks of cardiovascular events, death, and resource utilization. This application for Phase III of CRIC, which extends follow-up through 2018, is submitted by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Clinical Center and offers a unique opportunity to leverage the existing effort and success of CRIC to establish a cohort of participants with CKD who have long-term prospective follow-up on progression of kidney disease and a variety of different outcomes. During the first two phases of the CRIC Study, the UIC Clinical Center research team has been successful in terms of recruitment, retention, protocol implementation, data quality, a strong focus on heath disparities in CKD, a significant number of UIC investigator-led publications, and the promotion of new physician-scientists.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
2U01DK060980-13
Application #
8582269
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-N (M1))
Program Officer
Kusek, John W
Project Start
2001-09-28
Project End
2018-04-30
Budget Start
2013-08-19
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$635,000
Indirect Cost
$226,626
Name
University of Illinois at Chicago
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
098987217
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60612
Wing, Maria R; Devaney, Joseph M; Joffe, Marshall M et al. (2014) DNA methylation profile associated with rapid decline in kidney function: findings from the CRIC study. Nephrol Dial Transplant 29:864-72
Yang, Wei; Xie, Dawei; Anderson, Amanda H et al. (2014) Association of kidney disease outcomes with risk factors for CKD: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Am J Kidney Dis 63:236-43
Wing, Maria R; Yang, Wei; Teal, Valerie et al. (2014) Race modifies the association between adiposity and inflammation in patients with chronic kidney disease: findings from the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study. Obesity (Silver Spring) 22:1359-66
Grunwald, Juan E; Pistilli, Maxwell; Ying, Gui-Shuang et al. (2014) Retinopathy and progression of CKD: The CRIC study. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 9:1217-24
Deo, Rajat; Yang, Wei; Khan, Abigail M et al. (2014) Serum aldosterone and death, end-stage renal disease, and cardiovascular events in blacks and whites: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. Hypertension 64:103-10
Yaffe, Kristine; Kurella-Tamura, Manjula; Ackerson, Lynn et al. (2014) Higher levels of cystatin C are associated with worse cognitive function in older adults with chronic kidney disease: the chronic renal insufficiency cohort cognitive study. J Am Geriatr Soc 62:1623-9
Rahman, Mahboob; Yang, Wei; Akkina, Sanjeev et al. (2014) Relation of serum lipids and lipoproteins with progression of CKD: The CRIC study. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 9:1190-8
Scialla, Julia J; Xie, Huiliang; Rahman, Mahboob et al. (2014) Fibroblast growth factor-23 and cardiovascular events in CKD. J Am Soc Nephrol 25:349-60
Ricardo, Ana C; Yang, Wei; Lora, Claudia M et al. (2014) Limited health literacy is associated with low glomerular filtration in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Clin Nephrol 81:30-7
Chirinos, Julio A; Khan, Abigail; Bansal, Nisha et al. (2014) Arterial stiffness, central pressures, and incident hospitalized heart failure in the chronic renal insufficiency cohort study. Circ Heart Fail 7:709-16

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