The goal of the PASS Network is to determine the role of prenatal alcohol exposure in the risk for the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and adverse outcomes of pregnancy, particularly stillbirth and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), and in the potential inter-relationships between SIDS, stillbirth, and FASD. This application is in response to the Request for Application (RFA-HD-10-018) entitled "Role of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure in SIDS and Stillbirth". As requested, it proposes the completion of enrollment and follow-up of study participants and the performance of data analysis in Phase II of the PASS Network by the current five clinical, physiologic, biologic/pathologic, and data coordinating centers. The mission of the network is to conduct community-linked studies to investigate the role of prenatal alcohol exposure in the risk for SIDS, stillbirth and FAS, and to determine how these different outcomes are inter-related. The PASS Network is a collaborative effort comprised of two Comprehensive Clinical Sites (CCS) - Northern Plains Comprehensive Clinical Site (NPCCS) and Stellenbosch Comprehensive Clinical Site (SCCS), a Developmental Biology and Pathology Center (DBPC), a Physiology Assessment Center (PAC), and a centralized Data Coordinating and Analysis Center (DCAC) and program scientists and officers at the NICHD and NIAAA. This particular application pertains to the Physiology Assessment Center (PAC) of the PASS Network. The role of the PAC is to oversee the data collection infrastructure and analyze the physiological data from the 12,000 subjects tested at the PASS Network Clinical Sites. These early assessments will define physiological consequences of prenatal alcohol and other exposures prior to the development of adverse outcomes. The potential impact of this work is that, in combination with pathological, environmental and genetic findings, we will be better able to define the mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to stillbirth SIDS and FASD. The information gained will provide the potential for prospectively identifying fetuses and infants at greatest risk and the possibility for more precise targeting of early interventions. PUBLIC LEALTH

Public Health Relevance

The PASS Network will perform community-linked studies to determine the role of prenatal alcohol exposure in the risk for SIDS and adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially stillbirth and FASD. The study hopes to decrease fetal and infant death and improve child health in communities at high risk for prenatal maternal alcohol consumption.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
5U01HD055155-09
Application #
8731660
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-GG (02))
Program Officer
Raju, Tonse N
Project Start
2006-09-15
Project End
2016-07-31
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$710,247
Indirect Cost
$152,914
Name
Columbia University (N.Y.)
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
621889815
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10032
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