The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) and Return of Results Consortium (RoRC) programs are designed to investigate aspects of using exomic data clinically, considering clinical, technical, informatics, and bioethicl components including the return of genomic results. Our overall goal in this coordinating center proposal is to enhance the effectiveness of CSER/RoRC studies by assuring effective coordination and logistic support, moving cross-consortium work forward, and identifying synergies that increase the scientific value of the individual projects. In approaching this task, we leverage our experience as the coordinating center (CC) for the NHGRI Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMG), the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project and the Northwest Institute of Genetic Medicine (NWIGM) and our extensive collaborative experience, including electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE)5, the Centers of Excellence in ELSI Research (CEER) network and the Pharmacogenomics Research Network (PGRN) to facilitate the work of CSER and RoRC. These efforts will facilitate the future practice of genomic medicine. Our group has deep and broad expertise across all the relevant areas required for coordination including genomic sequencing technology and data-sharing, clinical informatics, clinical medical genetics, bioethics, molecular diagnostic testing, statistical genetics, covering a wide variety of disciplins such as internal medicine, neonatalogy, pediatrics, neurology, medical genetics, bioethics, pharmacogenetics and genomics, environmental genetics, translational bioinformatics, and health care outcomes and policy. We include members of the CSER and RoRC, as well as eMERGE, CMG, CEER, and PGRN programs which will maximize CSER and RoRC interactions across these programs. Our group understands the needs of both the CSER and RoR programs, and with the help of NHGRI and NCI, we will work within and outside of these programs to ensure success.
Specific Aims Aim1: Provide leadership and integrative, organizational and logistical support and facilitation of all activities necessary for the successful completion of the goals of the CSER Steering Committee (SC) and RoR Consortium, subcommittees, and working groups.
Aim 2 : Provide unique expertise to facilitate excellence and consortium products in the key program areas: ELSI, medical genetics and care integration, sequencing technology and sequence analyses, informatics and electronic medical record integration, and outcomes research.
Aim 3 : Optimize development and distribution of CSER/RoRC data and products, and facilitate interactions with other relevant NIH programs.

Public Health Relevance

Our overall goal in this coordinating center proposal is to enhance the effectiveness of Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) and Return of Results Consortium (RoRC) studies by assuring effective coordination and logistic support, moving cross-consortium work forward, and identifying synergies that increase the scientific value of the individual projects.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
3U01HG007307-02S1
Application #
8843604
Study Section
Program Officer
Hindorff, Lucia
Project Start
2014-06-01
Project End
2017-03-31
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$112,643
Indirect Cost
$39,735
Name
University of Washington
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Evans, Barbara J (2014) The First Amendment Right to Speak About the Human Genome. Univ Pa J Const Law 16:549-636
Gallego, Carlos J; Bennette, Caroline S; Heagerty, Patrick et al. (2014) Comparative effectiveness of next generation genomic sequencing for disease diagnosis: design of a randomized controlled trial in patients with colorectal cancer/polyposis syndromes. Contemp Clin Trials 39:1-8
Evans, Barbara J (2014) Economic regulation of next-generation sequencing. J Law Med Ethics 42 Suppl 1:51-66
Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Berg, Jonathan S et al. (2014) Return of genomic results to research participants: the floor, the ceiling, and the choices in between. Am J Hum Genet 94:818-26
Burke, Wylie; Evans, Barbara J; Jarvik, Gail P (2014) Return of results: ethical and legal distinctions between research and clinical care. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 166C:105-11
Shirts, Brian H; Jacobson, Angela; Jarvik, Gail P et al. (2014) Large numbers of individuals are required to classify and define risk for rare variants in known cancer risk genes. Genet Med 16:529-34
Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Fullerton, Stephanie M (2014) Returning pleiotropic results from genetic testing to patients and research participants. JAMA 311:795-6
Dorschner, Michael O; Amendola, Laura M; Shirts, Brian H et al. (2014) Refining the structure and content of clinical genomic reports. Am J Med Genet C Semin Med Genet 166C:85-92
Evans, Barbara J; Dorschner, Michael O; Burke, Wylie et al. (2014) Regulatory changes raise troubling questions for genomic testing. Genet Med 16:799-803
Evans, Barbara J (2013) Minimizing liability risks under the ACMG recommendations for reporting incidental findings in clinical exome and genome sequencing. Genet Med 15:915-20

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