The proposed University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) CCHI Administrative Core will be responsible for overall organization, management, decision-making, and periodic evaluation of the research projects, technology development projects, training programs, and cores within the UMB CCHI Center. The Core will also be responsible for data sharing, protection of intellectual property, and allocation of UMC CCHI resources. The main focus of the Administrative Core is successful implementation of the program goals to support basic and translational research on human immunological responses to NIAID Category A, B or C priority pathogens, their toxins, or other emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases, and to maintain a stable, flexible, yet centralized infrastructure to promote and coordinate multi-disciplinary research in human immunology as it relates to defense against these agents. The responsibilities of the CCHI Administrative Core will include, but are not limited to: 1) facilitating communications amongst the research, technology and pilot project leaders, scientific cores, and Principal Investigator;2) scheduling group meetings, and conferences;3) organizing presentations and publication of data;4) allocating and reallocating resources to meet program goals;and 5) tracking and prioritizing fiscal and other resources. A key factor in the success of any diverse program of this nature is maintaining continuous communication among the leadership team, investigators, administration, and NIH. The CCHI will interact on a daily basis to enhance communications with CCHI researchers, core leaders, and administrative and financial counterparts at all sites within the UMB CCHI. The core will also be responsible for resource sharing and transmission of information and reagents, management of the budget for programrelated travel (including travel for the annual meetings) and identifying and resolving problems and unexpected outcomes. The Core will also create and implement administrative and leadership mechanisms that will foster effective interactions among the CCHI investigators and institutions to ensure a productive research effort

Public Health Relevance

The main focus of the Administrative Core is successful implementation of the program goals to support basic and translational research on human immunological responses to NIAID Category A, B or C priority pathogens, their toxins, or other emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases, and to maintain a stable, flexible, yet centralized infrastructure to promote and coordinate multi-disciplinary research in human immunology as it relates to defense against these agents.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19AI082655-05
Application #
8485530
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-KS-I)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$256,096
Indirect Cost
$72,192
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Type
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
Salerno-Goncalves, R; Safavie, F; Fasano, A et al. (2016) Free and complexed-secretory immunoglobulin A triggers distinct intestinal epithelial cell responses. Clin Exp Immunol 185:338-47
Fresnay, Stephanie; McArthur, Monica A; Magder, Laurence et al. (2016) Salmonella Typhi-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cells play a dominant role in protection from typhoid fever in humans. J Transl Med 14:62
Blohmke, Christoph J; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire et al. (2016) Interferon-driven alterations of the host's amino acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of typhoid fever. J Exp Med 213:1061-77
Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Fasano, Alessio; Sztein, Marcelo B (2016) Development of a Multicellular Three-dimensional Organotypic Model of the Human Intestinal Mucosa Grown Under Microgravity. J Vis Exp :
McArthur, Monica A; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S et al. (2015) Activation of Salmonella Typhi-specific regulatory T cells in typhoid disease in a wild-type S. Typhi challenge model. PLoS Pathog 11:e1004914
Trebicka, Estela; Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N; Chen, Kejie et al. (2015) Intestinal Inflammation Leads to a Long-lasting Increase in Resistance to Systemic Salmonellosis that Requires Macrophages But Not B or T Lymphocytes at the Time of Pathogen Challenge. Inflamm Bowel Dis 21:2758-65
Wahid, R; Fresnay, S; Levine, M M et al. (2015) Immunization with Ty21a live oral typhoid vaccine elicits crossreactive multifunctional CD8+ T-cell responses against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, S. Paratyphi A, and S. Paratyphi B in humans. Mucosal Immunol 8:1349-59
Booth, Jayaum S; Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Blanchard, Thomas G et al. (2015) Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in the Human Gastric Mucosa and Blood: Role in Helicobacter pylori Infection. Front Immunol 6:466
Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie et al. (2015) Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 9:e0003837
Sztein, Marcelo B; Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; McArthur, Monica A (2014) Complex adaptive immunity to enteric fevers in humans: lessons learned and the path forward. Front Immunol 5:516

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