The Clinical Core has ultimate responsibility for recruiting patients and obtaining all patient-related specimens and data. Eligible patients are those referred for colonoscopy and upper endoscopy at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). Based on current patient volumes, we anticipate having approximately 8000 patients available for the study. The clinical core will be responsible for initial patient contact and patient enrollment, including obtaining appropriate written informed consent. They are responsible for coordinating the collection of blood and stool specimens, administration of vaccine, collecting demographic data, and collection of biopsy specimens during colonoscopy/upper endoscopy.

Public Health Relevance

The Clinical Core provides essential clinical services to the projects. This includes recruiting of patients, collection of blood and stool specimens, and tissue collection during upper endoscopy and colonoscopy.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19AI082655-05
Application #
8485535
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-KS-I)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$514,671
Indirect Cost
$161,477
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Type
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
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