The Pilot Project Core is proposed as an integral part of the CCHI to support research to generate preliminary data for the development and submission of future research applications for support from non- CCHI sources. A major purpose of this Core will be to enhance the UMB-CCHI research portfolio and the field of human immunology as it relates to defense against infectious disease. As such, the UMB-CCHI Pilot Project Core has the following Specific Aims:
Aim 1 : To enrich the UMB-CCHI research portfolio and incorporate new investigators and institutions into the field of human immunology for the purpose of generating preliminary data for the development and submission of future research applications in the area of human immunology.
Aim 2 : To solicit and review Pilot Project applications for two to three awards in the amount of $30,000 to $50,000 every two years.
Aim 3 : To support, monitor and integrate Pilot Projects into the UMB-CCHI research portfolio.
Aim 4 : To track the success of funded Pilot Projects as measured by publications, presentations, patents, and the ability to obtain subsequent funding.

Public Health Relevance

The Pilot Project Core is proposed as an integral part of the CCHI to support research to generate preliminary data for the development and submission of future research applications for support from non- CCHI sources. A major purpose of this Core will be to enhance the UMB-CCHI research portfolio and the field of human immunology as it relates to defense against infectious disease.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
2U19AI082655-06
Application #
8726154
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
6
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Rezwan, Tasmia; Sztein, Marcelo B (2014) B cells modulate mucosal associated invariant T cell immune responses. Front Immunol 4:511
Fiorentino, Maria; Levine, Myron M; Sztein, Marcelo B et al. (2014) Effect of wild-type Shigella species and attenuated Shigella vaccine candidates on small intestinal barrier function, antigen trafficking, and cytokine release. PLoS One 9:e85211
Waddington, Claire S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire et al. (2014) An outpatient, ambulant-design, controlled human infection model using escalating doses of Salmonella Typhi challenge delivered in sodium bicarbonate solution. Clin Infect Dis 58:1230-40
Wahid, Rezwanul; Zafar, Shah J; McArthur, Monica A et al. (2014) Live oral Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccines Ty21a and CVD 909 induce opsonophagocytic functional antibodies in humans that cross-react with S. Paratyphi A and S. Paratyphi B. Clin Vaccine Immunol 21:427-34
McArthur, Monica A; Sztein, Marcelo B; Edelman, Robert (2013) Dengue vaccines: recent developments, ongoing challenges and current candidates. Expert Rev Vaccines 12:933-53
Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; McArthur, Monica A; Seekatz, Anna M et al. (2013) Impact of oral typhoid vaccination on the human gut microbiota and correlations with s. Typhi-specific immunological responses. PLoS One 8:e62026
Barry, Eileen M; Pasetti, Marcela F; Sztein, Marcelo B et al. (2013) Progress and pitfalls in Shigella vaccine research. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol 10:245-55
Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Rasko, David A (2013) The human microbiome: from symbiosis to pathogenesis. Annu Rev Med 64:145-63
McArthur, Monica A; Sztein, Marcelo B (2013) Unexpected heterogeneity of multifunctional T cells in response to superantigen stimulation in humans. Clin Immunol 146:140-52
Wahid, Rezwanul; Simon, Jakub K; Picking, Wendy L et al. (2013) Shigella antigen-specific B memory cells are associated with decreased disease severity in subjects challenged with wild-type Shigella flexneri 2a. Clin Immunol 148:35-43

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