The objectives of the Administrative and Education Core (Core A) are to provide a robust infrastructure and communication network that promotes program faculty interactions and data dissemination to achieve the overall short and long-term goals of the research program. Core A is the prime decision making body for the program. Core A will: a) provide guidance and leadership on administrative and financial matters, b) facilitate communication among the research groups, cores and NIAID, c) promote scientific interactions, data sharing and discussions, d) disseminate information to the scientific community and public using the Systems Immunogenomics Webportal (SIGWP, Core E), e) host educational workshops, seminar series and web based training sessions, and f) ensure regulatory compliance and safety for all projects and cores. Success of the Cooperative Agreement is heavily dependent upon organized communication and the exchange of time-sensitive samples and complex datasets between the Research Projects and Cores. Core A is the pipeline connecting all Projects and Cores, tasked with providing the essential leadership and infrastructure that provides direction, oversight and quality control for the individual and interdependent activities of each project and core, ensuring maximum collaboration, transparent use of program resources and information exchange within our research community. This is accomplished in four broad aims: administrative and fiscal management, communication management, scientific oversight, and education outreach.

Public Health Relevance

Core A is assigned the complex task of overseeing the dissemination of genetic, phenotypic, and genomics data sets between the Projects and Cores;integrating concepts across projects, enabling communication, and education outreach, which will leverage the expertise of each member of the Cooperative Agreement to expedite discovery and achievement of the research goals.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19AI100625-03
Application #
8706028
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-07-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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