High quality clinical and epidemiologic research on tuberculosis requires well-run field sites in high burden TB settings that can recruit and retain TB patients, exposed contacts and controls; ensure secure and complete data collection and management; ensure that participant receive high quality appropriate clinical care; conduct appropriate laboratory testing and interact constructively with local clinics and National TB programs. Over the past 4 years, a Harvard- Socios-en-Salud team has built a highly efficient and well-organized research infrastructure that has recruited and retained over 16000 participants.
The aim of the Core is to support the TBRU's scientific project by recruiting and following TB patient and household contact cohorts in Lima, Peru, obtaining relevant data and samples and ensuring the efficient transfer of data and samples to the Data Management Center in Boston To that end, we propose to identify and reconsent 3000 of our initial cohort members with well defined TB outcomes for human genotyping and to enroll 300 new TB cases and 350 of their household contacts who will be followed for relevant outcomes and who will provide blood and urine samples for transciptional profiling and biomarker assessment.

Public Health Relevance

The aim of this Human Subjects Core is to support the TBRU's scientific goals by recruiting and following TB patient and household contact cohorts in Lima, Peru, obtaining relevant data and samples and ensuring the efficient transfer of data and samples to the Data Management Center in Boston.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19AI111224-05
Application #
9637303
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2019-02-01
Budget End
2020-01-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Brigham and Women's Hospital
Department
Type
DUNS #
030811269
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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