The scientific core is responsible for all of the particles that will be studied in the center. These responsibilities include thorough chemical and physical characterization of all particles, synthesizing new particles for the purposes of completing libraries and for introducing new functionality such as fluorescence, and designing and synthesizing highly specialized particles that will be used to test hypotheses arising from the in vitro and in vivo biological studies about injurious effects at the nano-bio interface. Accurate, thorough and interpretable characterization of Engineered Nanomaterial (ENM) libraries (Table 1) is an absolute necessity for studies of pulmonary toxicity. The physical and chemical properties must be delineated in order to provide a basis for interpreting molecular and cellular injury mechanisms. Manufacturers'statements about the properties of the materials that they ship provide varying degrees of completeness and accuracy. The Scientific Core will carry out all of its own measurements (see section IB) and provide reliable data in a uniform arid interpretable fonnat to the project leaders.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19ES019528-04
Application #
8464728
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-SET-V)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$289,085
Indirect Cost
$67,612
Name
University of California Los Angeles
Department
Type
DUNS #
092530369
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90095
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